Turn the page: Evergreen authors with new reads on the way

Olivia Jewell Love
olove@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 7/22/22

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Turn the page: Evergreen authors with new reads on the way

Posted

Looking for something to read? Support a local author.

Wildlife conservation photography

World-renowned author and wildlife conservation photographer Boyd Norton has a few new books in the works that will tell some of the stories of his life. 

One of these books is a memoir, and outlines his nuclear physics background and environmental work. When describing it, he remembers working at a reactor in Idaho and actually blowing it up

The other book in progress is about a program called DocuMerica, started by the EPA, that Norton was involved with in the 1970s. The program was started to document the state of the environment, the good and the bad. Norton’s book discusses the project and the mysteries that surrounded it, including the 20,000 photographs that went missing. 

Norton and his wife have lived in Evergreen for 52 years. Norton has authored and photographed 18 books, and has won numerous awards for his work, including the EPA award in the 1980s, the Sierra Club’s Ansel Adams Award for Conservation Photography in 2015 and the NANPA Lifetime Achievement Award. 

Norton got interested in environmental activism and photography after he became disillusioned with his career in nuclear physics with the Atomic Energy Commission. He started to get involved in the environmental movement in the ‘60s, and was then offered a job in Denver with the Wilderness Society. 

Norton has traveled all over the world to document the environment and hold photo tours and workshops. His favorite books he’s written, which he said were all a labor of love, include “Serengeti: The Eternal Beginning,” “The Mountain Gorilla,” and “The African Elephant: The Last Days of Eden.” 

Not only does Norton care about the environment, he also cares about people following the same path as him. He has written books and leads workshops on conservation photography to educate people on how to play an active role in their work. 

“I’ve done three books now for photographers, two of them on conservation photography, urging photographers to get involved in conservation. Use the photographs for a purpose, to show other people what’s going on in the natural world. The bad stuff and the good stuff. The beauty of nature,” he said. 


Mother and daughter write children's book
Annie Hutt found out her 2-year-old granddaughter needed glasses, and wanted to help ease the transition. With the help of her daughter, Katie Leigh, the two wrote and illustrated “Leila’s Glasses,” a children’s book about getting glasses and accepting yourself and your beauty. 

Neither of the women have been published before, but decided to take the leap for Leigh’s niece, Leila. 

Hutt did the writing, and Leigh did the illustrations. All the characters in the book are designed to look like family members, even Leigh’s dog. The family was thrilled to see themselves in the book, and is excited to know that other kids can read it when they feel nervous about getting glasses.

Leila, who is now 3, is shown as a 7-year-old in the book. She was all smiles when her aunt and grandma unveiled it to her.

“She got really excited; big smiles and pointing to herself,” Leigh said. 

The message of the book, which is to accept yourself for who you are, really hit home for Hutt and Leigh while creating it. The pair both felt doubtful about their writing and illustration skills, but by the end they realized they did a great job. 

Leigh realized when creating the book that there are not very many books about children getting glasses, and she wants to normalize the process. She has been working with lens companies to get her books in offices, and hopes to find other partnerships along the way. You can donate to their kickstarter to help offset publishing costs here. 

Coffee table book on Patagonia

After seeing the beauty at the edge of the world that many may never see, Alex Nicks decided to share his photographs with the world. 

Nicks, an Englishman who lives in Evergreen, finished his first book, “Portrait of Patagonia,” a coffee table book he created with Liz McGregor. The book contains vibrant and moving images of Futaleufú, Chile, and tells the stories of the people who live in the area. 

Nicks, primarily a videographer, has been to all ends of the earth to document the world. He’s been a videographer with National Geographic, and got his start in the industry through his love of kayaking.

Here is a clip of him kayaking in the area in Chile where his book is based. 

When thinking about putting together this book, Nicks said the idea was obvious. 

“The inspiration for the book came from the location being that spectacular,” he said. 

Nicks has spent most of his career working on wildlife documentaries, but after making this book he said he could see himself using some of his content for similar projects in the future. 

Nicks sees his travels as a great privilege, and hopes through his work that he can share his experiences with others. 

“I’m choosing to do stuff that I find absolutely compelling, and that is nature and wildlife,” he said. 

Nicks hopes his work speaks for itself. 

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