Trail planned through Meyer Ranch property

CAC, Jeffco Open Space plan educational kiosks on Conifer history

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/23/22

The Conifer Area Council and Jeffco Open Space want to preserve a piece of Conifer history.

The two organizations are working to create a trail that will go through the Meyer Ranch house property …

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Trail planned through Meyer Ranch property

CAC, Jeffco Open Space plan educational kiosks on Conifer history

Posted

The Conifer Area Council and Jeffco Open Space want to preserve another piece of Conifer history.

The two organizations are working to create a trail to run through the Meyer Ranch house property — that iconic yellow house that is the first sight for motorists rounding the corner on southbound U.S. 285 coming into Aspen Park. The trail will be part of Jeffco Open Space’s conservation greenprint to create a trail from Meyer Ranch Open Space Park to Flying J by 2025.

The trail is expected to have educational kiosks explaining the importance of the ranch to the history of Conifer, according to Jeffco Open Space spokesman Matt Robbins. Discussions were also taking place about what could be the best use for the house in the future, he said.

“We’re excited,” said Katie Rothman, who chairs the Meyer Ranch committee for the council. “We’re going to have something for and by the community and for the next generation. The trail will give people a chance to enjoy the views, learn something about Conifer history and feel the welcoming nature of Conifer.”

Shirley Johnson, president of the Conifer Area Council, called the trail similar to a living history museum.

The trail is projected to start at the parking lot on the east end of the Meyer Ranch property, move along U.S. 285, behind the house and Our Lady of the Pines Catholic Church to Eagle Cliff Road.

The house was built in 1889 in the Queen Anne style, and it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. It is sometimes called the Midway House because it is a central point between Denver and points west.

In 1950, the ranch, along with 330 acres of land, was bought by Norman F. and Ethel E. Meyer, who made substantial renovations to the home. After Norman Meyer died, Jeffco Open Space bought the home and 10 acres in 2015.

Johnson said the council has been spearheading efforts to make the ranch house and the surrounding property a community space for years. It received a $50,000 planning grant to investigate whether the ranch house could become a visitors center and a history museum, though it would take to expensive to create an interchange on U.S. 285.

Brainstorming among the council, Conifer Area Chamber of Commerce and Jeffco Open Space officials led to the idea of an educational trail, and council officials hope that one day, a picnic area can be added on the site.

CAC, Conifer Area Council, Meyer Ranch

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