Letter: Eyesore

Posted 6/8/22

Eyesore Bouchard says one benefit [presumably to the location FSBR proposes to devastate] is that the forest canopy will conceal the trails themselves, which would be only six to 12 feet wide. The …

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Letter: Eyesore

Posted

Bouchard says one benefit [presumably to the location FSBR proposes to devastate] is that the forest canopy will conceal the trails themselves, which would be only six to 12 feet wide. The only visible improvements would be the base lodge and the chairlift.

Evergreen forests don’t grow canopies; rarely do deciduous forests. The term canopy is typically reserved for rainforests. Since there is no canopy, it cannot “conceal.” Area residents know pines, spruces, firs and aspens do not grow so closely together that they block all lines of sight.

Depending on one’s location, portions of every road and utility easement around one’s home are visible. At least some of FSBR’s trails will be as wide as our roads and wider than our easements. There will be maintenance roads. The elevation change across the proposed development will not conceal, but reveal the multimillion dollar private development that is FSBR.

Clear-cutting dense forest for a massive lodge and wide parking lot; cutting a swath from the creek bottom nearly to Christopher Drive to accommodate a chairlift: these cannot be called improvements. Stark buildings, the lift visible from miles away, and over 16 miles of trails and maintenance roads scarring the mountainside at the expense of hundreds of acres of natural forest and wildlife habitat can only be called an eyesore.

The public comment period, restricted already by the designation of FSBR as a public entity, is approaching. Make your voice heard. Visit StopFullSendBikeRanch.comand CoSECC.org for updates and information.

G. Scott O’Connell, Conifer

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