Letter: FSBR will only endanger residents

Posted 5/12/22

From the January 2021 presentation to Conifer area residents:

Consolidation of riders… reduces pressure on local mixed use [sic] trail systems [and] will improve MTB EMS response in the Conifer Area.

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Letter: FSBR will only endanger residents

Posted

From the January 2021 presentation to Conifer area residents:

Consolidation of riders… reduces pressure on local mixed use [sic] trail systems [and] will improve MTB EMS response in the Conifer Area.

And in the Feb. 13, 2022, article from the Denver Gazette:

Bouchard [sic] noted that Jefferson County’s own [sic] Flying J Ranch Park has [sic] extensive mountain bike use…

Ignore the sickening trespass against written communication for the moment. The statements comprise outright falsehood.

Trail riding, one of three activities taking place at Flying J, fundamentally differs from free-ride, downhill mountain biking by about $5,000 in equipment and $80 a pop for an FSBR lift ticket. Trail riders currently share, without mishap, Jeffco Open Space or Denver Mountain Park mixed-use trail systems with hikers and horseback riders free of charge. It is extremely doubtful that trail riders will shell out the huge, additional expenditure.

Elk Creek Fire Protection District need not provide EMS service for as many as two to four injuries per day at FSBR if the multi-million dollar corporate “development” did not exist.

Finally, drawing 4,000 fire hazards a week up from Denver cannot, by any definition, be called “consolidation.” FSBR, instead, will endanger by its presence Conifer area residents, the lower Shadow and Conifer Mountain ecosystem, and wildlife with its tremendous burden on local resources and services.

Mr. Bouchard, FSBR, the Colorado State Land Board and Jefferson County are either unaware of the distinctions or presume we are. Or do they think Conifer area residents foolish?

G. Scott O'Connell, Conifer

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