Giving hearts

Two Elk Run residents spend their time helping others

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/1/21

The adage, “It’s better to give than to receive,” has never been truer for two Elk Run Assisted Living residents who volunteer their time to help fellow residents. Steve Kurland, 72, helps with …

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Giving hearts

Two Elk Run residents spend their time helping others

Posted

The adage, “It’s better to give than to receive,” has never been truer for two Elk Run Assisted Living residents who volunteer their time to help fellow residents.

Steve Kurland, 72, helps with various games and a men’s group, and he selects movies for residents to watch together, while Bettie Lynn Walden, 72, conducts a Bible study on Sundays. The two agree that helping out is worthwhile and makes them happy.

Marketing Director Lisa Carter explained that it’s important to help the seniors get involved in activities that bring them joy.

“We’re here to meet their needs,” Carter said, “and to engage them when they want to be engaged. If it brings them joy to contribute, we want that for them.”

For Kurland, a rock-n-roll aficionado and movie buff, selecting movies for residents is a labor of love. He chooses a variety to appeal to all tastes, though he says “The Dirty Dozen” is among his favorites. He helps with bingo games, keeps score and sets up a bowling game with plastic balls and pins, and helps facilitate a men’s group.

Walden spent much of her life traveling with her husband; both were ministers. Now, nearly every Sunday in the late afternoon, residents from all denominations join together for Walden’s Bible study, according to Sarah Bogdan, Elk Run’s activities coordinator.

“She has such a wealth of knowledge,” Bogdan said, “and her lessons can be applied to real life. She really has a gift.”

Walden said she began leading the Bible study because she saw a need.

“Some people are put here (at Elk Run), some people come here, and some don’t want to be here,” Walden explained. “When I got here, I could tell they needed something.”

She spends the entire week planning her Bible lesson, and it helps keeps her straight, as she put it.

“When my husband died two years ago, I thought I would not preach again,” she said. “To do this is a big gift.”

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