First Friday market provides venue for nonprofits, small businesses

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 7/14/21

Cards, syrups, dog bandanas, jewelry, candles and more — the Flower First Friday outdoor market in Kittredge is a chance for artisans and nonprofits to show their artistry and to explain to …

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First Friday market provides venue for nonprofits, small businesses

Posted

Cards, syrups, dog bandanas, jewelry, candles and more — the Flower First Friday outdoor market in Kittredge is a chance for artisans and nonprofits to show their artistry and to explain to attendees what they do.

The market will be open for two more Fridays — Aug. 6 and Sept. 3 — from 4-8 p.m. at Adobe Creek, and the artisans hope more will join their event at Adobe Creek by hosting tables or stopping by.

The outdoor market is a chance for them to get the word out about what they do, to network with similar businesses and to bring the community together. Most became part of the outdoor market through word-of-mouth.

Jen Schapiro, owner of Flower A Hair Salon in Adobe Creek, decided to put the first Friday events together to provide another place for local artists and artisans to showcase their work.

“It’s a community event that helps artists,” she said, noting that its location on Highway 74 is a draw for people driving by, and the event gets bigger every month. The artisans also direct attendees to area restaurants, figuring that the event can help all Kittredge businesses.

As live music played in the background, the artisans chatted with attendees and with each other, getting acquainted and looking at items for sale. The tables on July 2 were divided generally into two groups — nonprofits and small businesses.

On the nonprofit side, Debbie Wright with Indy & Olly’s, based in Evergreen, offered dog bandanas for sale. For every bandana sold, the nonprofit donates one to a dog rescue organization, hoping that the fashionable accessory will improve adoption photos.

Wild Wax Candle Co. based in Westminster sells candles, and each has a message and photo of an endangered or highly endangered species. Owner Sara Braiman started the nonprofit to combine her love of candles with her motivation to help wildlife.

Her slogan is the candles are a “bright light for conservation,” and she explained that the candles “bring beauty to your world inside and out.” Part of the candle-sale proceeds go to the Inland Ocean Coalition and WILD Foundation.

The businesses included Daddy’s Homemade Syrups, which sells a variety of syrups made by Dannie Burr, who started his business in the family kitchen; Katie Miller of Conifer, who started sewing masks during the pandemic and branched out, adding kids clothing and reusable towels; Lynn Otto of Evergreen, who started LDO Creates after leaving a high-stress corporate job to foster her love of making one-of-a-kind greeting cards.

Maggie Montgomery of Kittredge started making mala necklaces and decided to try selling them at the fair. She said the market has been “super fun,” enjoying time talking with other artisans and guests. This is the first time she has sold her malas at an outdoor market.

Julie Nolan of Aurora loves making jewelry and since she hasn’t worked because of the pandemic, she focused on making necklaces, pins and more from repurposed items.

“There’s no method to this,” she said, referring to the jewelry she makes. “It’s just a creative outlet.”

Margi Stoops of Indian Hills, a retired elementary school teacher, decided to try creating acrylic-based trinket and jewelry boxes, glasses and more to keep busy. She paints trees onto the items.

“I’ve always liked crafting,” she said. “It’s a lot of fun.”

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