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Features

  • Heather Kapande feels lucky, especially this Mother’s Day, because she has two wonderful sons.

    Both of them — Dane, 20, and Troy, 15 — have escaped dangerous situations in their young lives. Kapande wishes she were a superhero who had ways to keep them safe.

    Troy is a student at STEM School in Highlands Ranch. Luckily for the family, Troy was home on May 7 when two shooters entered the school, killing one and injuring eight.

  • I don’t think I’ve ever met a person in her 80s who is more engaged in life and involved in numerous endeavors than Conifer resident Vivian Burrows.

    As an example, I had to request an appointment time with her last week as she had a birthday party in Bailey in the morning and Great Decisions in the evening. She would have to leave that group early to get to choir practice.

    She also found time to drop off some laundry for her son, a much-beloved bagger at Evergreen Safeway, Craig Burrows. Whew!

  • The Alderfer Barn has gotten a facelift in the past two weeks, thanks to volunteers and staff from the nonprofit HistoriCorps.

    On Thursday, workers replaced the boards on the west end of the barn on Buffalo Park Road. They also worked on rebuilding the barn doors, replacing window sills and making repairs to the foundation.

  • An Evergreen woman has written a book about the five years she lived on the island of Crete near Greece.

    Melanie Crane said the experiences deepened her faith in God and in herself, and she learned a lot about other people and cultures.

    Her book is called “Uniquely Crete: Life Redefined on a Greek Island.” She will sign her book and read from it from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, April 26, at the Bread Lounge in Bergen Park. In keeping with the book’s theme, Mediterranean food will be served.

  • Many activities kept kids busy and learning at the Care for the Earth Fair on Saturday, but none was quite as popular as Neffy.

    Neffy, a 3-month-old Nubian goat, walked among the booths with her owner Lori Tigner with Westfarm Goats in Morrison. Neffy was born three months premature, so Tigner hand-raised her in the house.

    “She a house goat,” Tigner said as she showed Neffy to attendees. Her full name is Nefertari, which means “beautiful companion.”

  • As the sun began its evening descent behind the Front Range, dozens of camouflaged cadets took to the lawn of Waterstone Community Church with radios in hand.

    The cadets, all members of the Dakota Ridge squadron of the Civil Air Patrol, spent much of Monday evening learning to communicate via radio in preparation for an upcoming event in which they’ll be assisting with parking and security. But that is just a fraction of what the group learns through CAP.

  • An Evergreen resident had to re-evaluate her life after a skiing accident in mid-December 2017.

    “I realized after my skiing accident that I had some decisions to make,” shares Evergreen senior citizen Miki Farrin.

    She had been skiing for many decades when she was “hit by a large male” from behind her on the slopes, resulting in a broken pelvis and coccyx, dislocated shoulder, broken optical bone and full-brain concussion.

  • “Our sunshine” — That’s how Bonnie and Keith Florquist describe their daughter Sancy Shaw, who died in a Christmas Eve accident on Interstate 70 at Genesee.

    “She was funny, able to speak her mind, competitive and a tomboy,” Bonnie said in an interview at the Florquists’ Evergreen home recently. “She was an overachiever. Give her a task, and she would do it 10 times better.”

    Sancy’s friends couldn’t agree more.

  • I met Bill Weisenborn well over a decade ago when, after hearing AT HOME in Evergreen Inc., the affordable housing initiative, present to the Pathfinders group, Bill elected to join the AT HOME board.

    It wasn’t until very recently that I discovered just how active he is in our community. In addition to Pathfinders, he sits on the Evergreen Christian Outreach board, mentors a public school student in the “Leaping into Literacy” program and is a regular church attendee. 

  • Two area organizations are working to providing a community for retirees in the foothills.

    Conifer Newcomers & Neighbors and Evergreen Newcomers and Neighbors — both with members ranging in age from the 30s to 80s — tend to attract those 55 and older, creating a network of friendships and activities.

    The groups are part social clubs, part networking, part support. They are places where area residents can meet others. Contrary to their names, both groups are more about neighbors getting together no matter how long they have lived in the foothills.

  • This Friday night, StageDoor Theatre celebrates its first performance in its newly created Black Box Theatre. This type of production is relatively new and is still considered experimental theatre. For StageDoor, it means a dark, separate room from the usual stage that doesn’t demand many props or set changes. The room, with its newly painted blue walls, seats about 45 people and is ideal for intimate staging that truly draws the audience inside.

  • If you are searching for something distinctive, uncommon and creative to do while in Evergreen, why not go paint a rhino? Karen Belmont, owner of Go Paint, puts it another way: “Step into your imagination!” Go Paint Rhinos is the latest project of the paint-your-own pottery studio, which also includes a build-your-own miniature garden called WeeScapes. Belmont took over ownership of the business two years ago from original owner Lisa Wood. Soon thereafter, she incorporated WeeScapes and has been hard at work ever since.

  • This Saturday a book signing in Evergreen will be the catalyst for kids and parents to explore the area in an effort to solve a code they will be handed at the event. HearthFire Books and Treats will host the mother-daughter writing team of Pat Toole and Sara Miller as they introduce their recently published book, “Path of the Thunderbird … A Grand Canyon Adventure.”

  • When Breckenridge native and former Evergreen resident Shelli Kelly says that she works a double, she doesn’t mean a shift.
    Kelly is the female backup singer for two bands that set the bar high when it comes to “show.” A couple weeks ago, Shelvis and the Roustabouts rocked the Little Bear to beats from the ‘50s. As the name implies, there’s a strong breath of Elvis woven into the act, and lead singer and guitarist Lori Muha packs a surprise revealed only at the end of the night.

  • The Evergreen Chorale launches into spring with its presentation of “Sun, Moon, Earth and Sea” for two performances only this Friday and again on Sunday.
    Through heartfelt expression and song, the concert is poised to sweep you away, deep into the realm of majestic nature. Sight combined with sound accentuates the many sensations normally found outdoors. Clouds, snowflakes, trees, butterflies and mountains, to name a few, will be offered for your imagination and enjoyment.

  • You’re never too young to find your passion.
    Elvis Rankin of Evergreen discovered his passion at 3 1/2 when his grandfather introduced him to his first midget racecar.
    Today at age 9, he has won an abundance of awards competing in Quarter Midget Racing and has a car in the American Museum of Speed in Lincoln, Neb.
    Elvis, along with his parents, Randy and Lisa Rankin, joined Rocky Mountain Quarter Midget Association after Elvis turned 5, and he has been racing every since.

  • I met Barbara Waldvogle in 2012 shortly after she moved into the Life Care Center here in Evergreen. It is the privilege of local clergy to provide worship for the residents on a rotating basis. I have enjoyed this opportunity since 2004.

  • A Conifer student personifies the notion that young people can make a difference.

    Kayla Wolins, 15, a freshman at Colorado Academy, has donated more than $18,000 over the last three years to the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, a haven for large animals such as bears, tigers, lions and coyotes.

  • A Morrison man is showing the flag — literally — to do his part to stop the divisiveness that surrounded November’s presidential election.

    Jeff McNamara has taken to waving an American flag near his home at U.S. 285 and Sourdough Drive, at the roundabout in Marshdale, on overpasses along C-470, and elsewhere. He calls his stints with the flag “Yay America” rallies.

  • Environmental concerns — including high lead levels in tap water at Jeffco schools, a dangerous chemical found buried at the Lockheed-Martin plant in South Jeffco, and the effects of planned development in the Rooney Valley — dominated the headlines in Jefferson County news last year.

    Toxic waste found buried at Lockheed Martin facility