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Columns

  • Romberg: Considerable change awaits General Assembly

    When the Colorado General Assembly convenes next week, things will be considerably different than they’ve been for the last several years.

  • Doyle: Let’s continue the holidays’ season of giving

    It’s that time of year again when everyone is filled with good cheer, smiles abound, lights are twinkling and the delicious aroma of baking fills the air.  
    Throughout the year, our community demonstrates what a wonderful welcoming place this is to live. There are so many ways that we are offered to express our appreciation and how grateful we are to live here. There are more food, toy and clothing drives than I can count, whether they are to benefit local residents or those far away who have no connection with our community.

  • Romberg: Changing history and hiding records

    As it has become easier to gather information about people over the Internet, concerns have been raised about how disclosure of earlier indiscretions can impact their lives. People with criminal records often find it difficult to rent a home or get employment. Those criminal records have been likened to scarlet letters by some advocacy groups who’ve argued that people who cannot move on from their crimes are more subject to recidivism than people who can move on with their lives without the stigma of their criminal pasts.

  • Posner: Of snowballs and bad law

    Last time, we spoke about bedrock constitutional principles we can’t do without.
    This time, in honor of the 12 days of Christmas, and the eight days of Hanukkah, and the old jelly-belly “ho-ho-ho!,” let’s have a laugh at some Colorado laws we can easily do without.
    This column is in honor of Dane Best, a 9-year-old in Severance, Colo., who recently persuaded the
    town council to overturn
    a town law prohibiting snowball fights.

  • Riddell: ‘Screwtape politics’

    Perhaps you’ve heard of the recent surreptitious discovery of a heretofore top-secret code book. The booklet apparently has been widely circulated among Progressive Democratic Party operatives and is rather explicit in its guidelines for use. This information was forwarded to me by a former card-carrying member of the book’s Pocket Progressive Democrats. This fellow is now hiding out in a box of uncounted ballots somewhere in the swamps of Florida.

  • Glass: 5A, 5B will bring a positive impact to Jeffco schools

    Dr. Jason Glass

    The results of the 2018 election have finally been certified and they mean improved opportunities for students, better pay for our educators and staff, and improved buildings in Jeffco.
    During this election cycle, I talked extensively with people in our community about their choices on the ballot.
    With ballot questions 5A and 5B as local measures and Amendment 73 at the state level, voters in Jeffco had important and meaningful options to consider.

  • Riddell: Politics and the judicial system

    Many of us like to take comfort in the illusion that we are all equal in the eyes of the law. We like to think that the law is simply a matter of white or black, a clarity of justifiable correctness.
    Yet we see daily that its application results in varying shades of oftentimes confusing and confounding grayness. Have you ever wondered what affects the degree of shading?

  • Posner: Holiday healing

    Steve Posner

  • Romberg: Giving season can be a taxing situation

    As we near the end of 2018 and many people make their end-of-the-year charitable gifts, it will be interesting to see how our new tax laws impact charitable contributions in Colorado and across the country.
    Under the new law, the standard deduction has increased to $12,000 from $6,350 for individuals and to $24,000 from $12,700 for married couples. This change means that the number of people who will take the standard deduction will increase significantly.

  • Webb: Grateful for forgiveness

    There was a story in the Washington Post recently that described the medical team that treated Tree of Life synagogue shooter Robert Bowers. At least three of the doctors and nurses who treated him were Jewish.
    They treated him no differently from any other patient although they had been informed of the source of his injuries. They had a job to do and like any other professional, they did it.