.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Romberg: Saying goodbye to Dino’s

    At the end of the month, one of my favorite places in Jefferson County will be gone. The owner of Dino’s Italian Restaurant, just off the corner of Kipling and Colfax in Lakewood, announced that the restaurant will close Sept. 30 after 58 years in business.

  • Glass: Back to school

    August means back-to-school for students in Jeffco. Teachers, principals and staff have been hard at work for weeks getting ready for this coming school year, and students report back Aug. 14.

    Thanks to Jeffco voters, who passed construction bond question 5B in 2018, there are also some exciting changes coming to Jeffco schools this school year. Construction crews have been busy across our community this summer, hard at work on the first wave of projects and improvements.

  • Rohrer: It’s not the economy, stupid

    People are feeling better about the economy, and there is an incumbent president in the race for 2020. It’s just our nature to feel good about a president when the economy is good, but is that a fact-based approach?

    While presidents often receive the blame or credit, economists believe that the availability of capital and labor and technological advancement drive our economy. The two most important measures of our economic state are the number of jobs being created and the resulting unemployment rate. What is the true economic story of our country?

  • Rohrer: Perspective

    There are a lot of things to be upset about today. There were two shootings within a few hours, one in El Paso, Texas, and the other some 20 miles from my hometown in Dayton, Ohio. Thirty-one innocent Americans were killed and 50 more were wounded.

  • Rockwell: The debate over the NPV bill

    I was approached three times this summer to sign a petition calling for a repeal of the National Popular Vote bill passed by the legislature this spring. Perhaps someone has asked you, “Do you want to give away your vote to California?” What’s this all about?

    The National Popular Vote bill creates an interstate compact that would result in our future presidents being those who receive the most votes — just like every other election in this country.

  • Webb: Language matters

    As Rush Limbaugh is fond of saying, words mean things. This is especially true when a popular catchphrase is uttered without thinking about the meaning of the words that has been spoken. One of those phrases that seems to be popular in that regard is “our children.”

  • Rohrer: We should choose to go to the moon again

    It’s been 50 years since Neil Armstrong stepped out of the lunar module onto the surface of the moon. News media around the world covered every detail of the Apollo 11 project to land the first human on the moon and a safe return.

    All Americans who were adults in 1969 remember well how exhilarating the event was. The pride our astronauts brought us was uniquely wonderful.

  • Romberg: Friends for the Future

    Three Republican members of the Colorado House of Representatives — two who left office last year and one who is still serving — have formed a new organization, Friends for the Future, with hopes that a different approach might lead to more Republican success and more balance of power in Colorado government.

  • Generations: For the Davey family, it’s all about the military and sports

    I wanted to write about a family with longstanding and ongoing presence in the military, and Bruce Davey of Evergreen certainly fits the bill.

    • Bruce grandfather was a Navy doctor.

    • Bruce’s father, Harry, was career Navy, serving many places including the U.S. and Germany.

    • Bruce’s mother, Jane, had members of the Royal Navy of Britain in her family tree, specifically her father and grandfather. 

    • Bruce’s brother Douglas, like Bruce, is a former Navy pilot.

  • Rohrer: Term limits versus gerrymandering

    The 2018 U.S. House of Representatives election resulted in control moving from Republicans to Democrats despite a furious “save the House” effort by Republicans.

    Some are calling it a blue wave, yet even in this year of change, 91 percent of incumbents were re-elected. One hundred seventy-six Democrats ran for re-election and 99 percent, or 174, won. Two hundred two Republicans ran and 85 percent, or 171, won. There were 33 incumbents who didn’t seek re-election and those seats resulted in a net gain of five seats for Democrats.