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Columns

  • Glass: The Columbine question

    Earlier this month, we asked an important question of the Jeffco community: should we do something different with Columbine High School?

    Specifically, we put forth a preliminary proposal to rebuild a new high school west of the current site. The Hope Columbine library, which was constructed after the 1999 tragedy, would be retained, as would the Columbine High School name and traditions.

    Since asking this question of the community, more questions have come forth about the proposal. One of those is why now? There are three primary reasons.

  • Greene: The price is right at a Colorado SNOTEL

    Any discussion of water just about always means addressing drought. After all, Colorado was in one for 19 years. It’s not surprising that water is a big deal in the United States and has been the impetus behind the creation of a dizzying array of organizations with brain-numbing acronyms.

  • On the Move; Nature – A place for renewal

    I recently got the gift of a nice hike on Mason Creek and Bear Paw to the Pikes Peak Overlook at Staunton State Park. For me, it’s especially poignant because I had an extensive surgery on May 24, and I had to go a period without exercise.

    It was such a gift to be in nature and physically capable of hiking up there. It makes the sound of Mason Creek and the views that much more special.

  • Rohrer: The quiet branch of government – the judiciary

    I recently read the “The Chief,” a book about Chief Justice John Roberts. The book gave a real insight into the current Supreme Court judges as well as many who helped mold this conservative’s career. He clerked for conservative judges Henry Friendly and William Rehnquist. He took positions in the Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations. As the Chief Justice, he is dedicated to protecting the idea that the court is above politics.

  • Romberg: ‘de-Brucing’ is right thing for county, state

    Most Coloradans know that TABOR, the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights, is a constitutional amendment that requires voter approval to increase taxes. While that provision has significantly changed how governments operate, another part of the amendment that limits spending based upon a formula of population and inflation has resulted in more significant restrictions on government operations.

  • Romberg: CU Regents didn’t do us any favors

    We’ve got to hope that if they could do it over again, members of the University of Colorado Board of Regents would’ve named more than one presidential finalist.

    Forget that it takes a cynical interpretation of a law that says if three or fewer people meet the minimum qualifications for a job that all of them must be identified as finalists to justify that there are no finalists until three or fewer people are under consideration when the law makes no statement about how many people constitute finalists.

  • Rohrer: Millennials are the future of America … I’m OK with that

    Every now and then, I get an e-mail that makes fun of millennials by depicting them as clueless and self-absorbed. I hate those references because it seems wrong to define people by some arbitrary grouping.

    I don’t like being labeled old, left-handed or a has-been although all are true. We all like to be judged by who we are versus some label.

  • Generations: Evergreen Christian Church: Envisioning a bright future

    This column will be different from other Generations columns because it will focus on exciting changes taking place in a local institution, through the sharings of two of our area senior citizens. I was fortunate recently to sit with Bob Cooper and Nancy Arsenault of Evergreen Christian Church, Disciples of Christ.

  • Webb: Think about all who served on Memorial Day

    By Joe Webb

    Back in the 1940s, there was a 9- or 10-year-old boy who was sent to his grandparents’ home from time to time. His grandparents were dead by that time, and the house was occupied by various aunts and uncles who lived there, some with their families. In one bedroom was the ghostly spectral presence of the boy’s Uncle Frank.

  • Rockwell: Media literacy bill will teach kids vital skills

    By Linda Rockwell

    The Colorado General Assembly adjourned early this month after 120 very full days. The session has been characterized as productive, transformative, even aggressive. A Denver Post headline read, “Colorado lawmakers were busy changing your lives.”