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Columns

  • Hicks: Sorry kids but summertime is over

    Thursday started probably like most other school days. Parents woke up at the crack of dawn, if not earlier, to get things in order and children followed suit — I’m sure some a bit grumpy, others happy as could be that another school year was upon us.

    Wait, what? It’s time for school already. But it’s only Aug. 15. How could this be?

    Wait, you’re telling me some kids have already been in school for at least a day, some even longer in other parts of the state or country. How can this be? It is still summertime.

  • Romberg: Demanding efficient use of public money

    When I think about tax policy and the impact of taxes on regular people, I often think about a conversation I had with former state rep. Betty Neale when the General Assembly was considering legislation to require people to have more elements in their auto insurance policies.

  • Greene: Will Colorado roll out the red carpet for the gray wolf?

    Ready or not, you could be approached by someone wielding a clipboard who wants to educate you about the Gray Wolves Initiative.

    The plan will require Colorado’s Parks and Wildlife Commission to develop and implement a plan to reintroduce gray wolves to the state’s Western Slope. In 2020, voters could have the opportunity to weigh in on whether they are willing to bring back the apex predator that has been absent from Colorado since 1940.

  • Rohrer: It’s not the economy, stupid

    People are feeling better about the economy, and there is an incumbent president in the race for 2020. It’s just our nature to feel good about a president when the economy is good, but is that a fact-based approach?

    While presidents often receive the blame or credit, economists believe that the availability of capital and labor and technological advancement drive our economy. The two most important measures of our economic state are the number of jobs being created and the resulting unemployment rate. What is the true economic story of our country?

  • Glass: Back to school

    August means back-to-school for students in Jeffco. Teachers, principals and staff have been hard at work for weeks getting ready for this coming school year, and students report back Aug. 14.

    Thanks to Jeffco voters, who passed construction bond question 5B in 2018, there are also some exciting changes coming to Jeffco schools this school year. Construction crews have been busy across our community this summer, hard at work on the first wave of projects and improvements.

  • Rohrer: Perspective

    There are a lot of things to be upset about today. There were two shootings within a few hours, one in El Paso, Texas, and the other some 20 miles from my hometown in Dayton, Ohio. Thirty-one innocent Americans were killed and 50 more were wounded.

  • Webb: Language matters

    As Rush Limbaugh is fond of saying, words mean things. This is especially true when a popular catchphrase is uttered without thinking about the meaning of the words that has been spoken. One of those phrases that seems to be popular in that regard is “our children.”

  • Rockwell: The debate over the NPV bill

    I was approached three times this summer to sign a petition calling for a repeal of the National Popular Vote bill passed by the legislature this spring. Perhaps someone has asked you, “Do you want to give away your vote to California?” What’s this all about?

    The National Popular Vote bill creates an interstate compact that would result in our future presidents being those who receive the most votes — just like every other election in this country.

  • Romberg: Friends for the Future

    Three Republican members of the Colorado House of Representatives — two who left office last year and one who is still serving — have formed a new organization, Friends for the Future, with hopes that a different approach might lead to more Republican success and more balance of power in Colorado government.

  • Rohrer: We should choose to go to the moon again

    It’s been 50 years since Neil Armstrong stepped out of the lunar module onto the surface of the moon. News media around the world covered every detail of the Apollo 11 project to land the first human on the moon and a safe return.

    All Americans who were adults in 1969 remember well how exhilarating the event was. The pride our astronauts brought us was uniquely wonderful.