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Today's News

  • Jeffco health official confirmed to federal post

    Lynn Johnson, executive director at the Jefferson County Department of Human Services, has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate to the position of assistant secretary for family support in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Nominated for the post by President Donald Trump in June 2017, Johnson was confirmed in a 67 to 28 vote on Aug. 28 with all Republicans voting in favor as well as 19 Democrats, including U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet.

  • Lookout Mountain woman sentenced in infant’s death

    Bethany Joy Smith, the Lookout Mountain woman accused of killing her 3-month-old son in May 2016, was sentenced to 17 years in prison last week after pleading guilty on June 29 to one felony charge of negligent child abuse causing death and one felony charge of first-degree assault.

    Smith, 23 also received a mandatory five-year parole sentence, which she will serve at the end of her sentence.

  • POLITICAL BRIEFS

    Neguse endorsed by DC animal rights lobbying firm

    The Humane Society Legislative Fund, the lobbying branch of the Humane Society of the United States, has endorsed Democrat Joe Neguse in his bid for Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District seat.

  • King-Murphy students finding answers during Genius Hour

    Shortly after the morning bell rang on Thursday, second-grade teacher Alicia Needham began telling her students about how she woke up last night to the smell of smoke.

    She explained that there were wildfires burning throughout Colorado, and she asked her students how she might find out information about them.

    The students suggested web browsers Google and Wonderopolis, digital assistants Alexa and Siri, and reaching out to knowledgeable people who are near where the fires are burning.

  • Buyers, sellers both can benefit as real estate market starts to balance

    While the foothills real estate market is still strongly favoring sellers, area agents say it’s slowly beginning to cool — a good thing for both buyers and sellers.

    The market here is moving toward being more neutral, especially for homes priced under $2 million, agents say, with some homes selling within hours while others are on the market for several months — a huge change from three years ago when homes were being snapped up at lightning speed.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    He’s not wrong

  • Wilmot back to normal after water main break Friday

    By Deb Hurley Brobst
    Staff Writer
    School returned to normal on Monday at Wilmot Elementary School after a water main break on Friday. School remained open Friday even though the water had to be shut off.
    “I am nothing but impressed with everyone here,” Karen Quanbeck, chief of schools for Jeffco elementary schools, said.
    Quanbeck was at Wilmot all day Friday to help with shepherding children through one set of bathrooms in the school. All other bathrooms were closed. Many cases of water were brought in.

  • Aspen Park lots rezoned for mini-storage

    The Jefferson County Commissioners unanimously approved the rezoning of four lots in Aspen Park to allow for mini-storage.
    According to information provided at last week’s public hearing, three of the four lots that make up the 1.66-acre property located at 9529 Davis Ave. in Conifer were rezoned in 1993 to allow for self-storage. The applicant, Richard Larson, recently proposed rezoning all four lots to allow for self-storage under one official development plan.

  • Amendments have my vote; what about yours?

    It takes at least two-thirds of the members of both the House of Representatives and Senate to refer proposed constitutional amendments from Colorado’s legislature to its people.  
    In addition to those super majority votes, all of the proposals are subject to a public hearing with testimony from interested members of the public and debate with two votes on the floor of both the House and Senate. With all of those criteria, it’s usually a safe bet that amendments referred by the legislature deserve support.

  • A lot to chew on with ballot questions

    Dr. Jason Glass