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Today's News

  • Therapy labradoodles bring a calming presence during the school day at CCHS

    Clear Creek High School is going to the dogs — literally.

    Labradoodles Reiley and Cannon have become familiar sights in the halls of the school, and students have learned they are gentle companions who just want to hang out and be petted. They are trained therapy dogs, providing a calming effect on students and teachers.

    The canines belong to CCHS counselor Emma Phipps, who brings one of the pair to school each day. They hang out with her or in the therapy dog lounge with students who’ve been trained to be handlers.

  • Armed man who barricaded self believed to be found dead

    An armed man who barricaded himself in a home in the 12500 block of southbound U.S. 285 on Monday evening was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound inside the house Tuesday morning, ending a 16-hour standoff with the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office.

  • Sketch released in Maggie Long murder investigation

        Five months after Maggie Long was found murdered at her family's home in Bailey, investigators have released a sketch of an individual they say was seen at the home the day she died. According to a flier released Friday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and circulated by the Park County Sheriff's Office and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the individual is a light-complected male with short hair who may or may not have been driving an older model van or pickup truck.

  • Educators, parents rally for more funding

    The teachers are not all right — they’re mad as hell about education funding, and they want legislators to do something about it.
    On Thursday and Friday, thousands of educators and other supporters from more than a dozen school districts across the state — including Jeffco and Clear Creek — descended upon the state Capitol in hopes of sending a clear message to lawmakers about how they feel about teacher compensation and school funding in Colorado.

  • The daily circus

    Sometimes the apparent absurdities of our national politics simply defy explanation. In an attempt to impart some sanity, it appears to me that the best analogy may well be that of a circus.
    Traditionally, our most popular circuses have featured compelling ringmasters directing the audience’s attention to the ever-changing entertainment in one of three rings. Today we have the national media as self-serving ringmasters directing the public’s attention to what they deem as the story of the moment, the issue or issues that best serve their anti-Trump agenda.

  • Gratitude for family, friends, life

    On the day before Easter, my daughters Alex and Bekah and I had stopped on the hill above Mid-Vail to discuss our final run of the day. The next thing I remember was emergency room personnel in the Vail hospital discussing whether I should be taken to Denver Health by ambulance or by helicopter.
    My daughters later told me that I had hit a patch of ice and taken a fall that had broken my helmet (which, thankfully, I was wearing) and my bindings and left me bleeding profusely from my face.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Sanitized for your protection

  • Evergreen man sentenced for violation of endangered species act

    Paul Ross Jackson, 63, of Evergreen, pleaded guilty on April 24 to violating the Endangered Species Act and was immediately sentenced to pay the maximum fine of $25,000 by U.S. Magistrate Judge Scott T. Varholak.
    According to a release from the U.S. attorney’s office, the defendant violated Zimbabwe’s Parks and Wild Life Act when he shot and killed an African elephant inside Gonarezhou National Park in the spring of 2015.

  • ‘Mattress’ promises lots of laughs

    If you’re in the mood to laugh, then StageDoor Theatre’s “Once Upon a Mattress” is for you.

    The show is being performed by the theater’s middle school company, and director Kris Sage calls the group of 25 actors really good.

    “I’m extremely biased,” said Sage, who also is the vocal music and drama teacher at West Jefferson Middle School. “They have worked their tails off.”

  • It’s a dirty job and someone’s gotta do it

    Second-graders at Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen fanned out through Elk Meadow on Thursday to pick up trash and other items they found that are bad for the environment.

    Armed with large bags and trash grabbers, they called out when they found something to be picked up — and most of it was dog poop.

    The youngsters understood that it was important to pick up all forms of trash “so grass doesn’t stop growing,” second-grader Mateo Goodheart explained.