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Today's News

  • Cadets learn about aviation, emergency response

    As the sun began its evening descent behind the Front Range, dozens of camouflaged cadets took to the lawn of Waterstone Community Church with radios in hand.

    The cadets, all members of the Dakota Ridge squadron of the Civil Air Patrol, spent much of Monday evening learning to communicate via radio in preparation for an upcoming event in which they’ll be assisting with parking and security. But that is just a fraction of what the group learns through CAP.

  • County dollars secured for PorchLight Family Justice Center

    Jefferson County will officially provide funds for PorchLight Family Justice Center after the center successfully raised more than $100,000 in a little more than a month.

    During a staff briefing in February, the county committed to match funds up to $250,000 if PorchLight received at least $100,000 in funding from a number of potential sources by April. District Attorney Pete Weir and others associated with the project attended an April 9 staff briefing to share that the goal had been met.

  • Inside the Outdoors: The intersection of cars and wildlife: What happens if you hit an animal?

    The sun is just breaking over the mountain as you drive to work, and a deer springs heedlessly and unavoidably into your path.

    Later in the evening, the shadows are long across the road as dusk settles. As you crest the last hill before home, you are greeted with the sight of two elk standing innocently, but at their peril, in the road.

  • News Briefs

    Fire guts Aspen Park home
    Firefighters from three mountain-area fire departments spent hours Friday night putting out a blaze that destroyed a home in Aspen Park.
    According to Elk Creek FIre Protection District, when firefighters arrived on scene at 25758 Rea Avenue, a few miles east of JJ Madwells, they found about 50 percent of the house on fire. The home eventually was a total loss, but there were no injuries.
    The call came in at 10:15 p.m. A cause is still under investigation.

  • Hiwan Hills property owner withdraws lot application

    A hearing to decide whether to remand a case back to the Jeffco Planning Commission ended in the applicant withdrawing his proposal altogether.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Cracking wise

  • Generations: Miki Farrin: Surviving and Thriving

    An Evergreen resident had to re-evaluate her life after a skiing accident in mid-December 2017.

    “I realized after my skiing accident that I had some decisions to make,” shares Evergreen senior citizen Miki Farrin.

    She had been skiing for many decades when she was “hit by a large male” from behind her on the slopes, resulting in a broken pelvis and coccyx, dislocated shoulder, broken optical bone and full-brain concussion.

  • ‘A little bit of light in the darkness that they have’

    When Ramsey Turner first walked in to meet with the victim specialists at the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office, she was overwhelmed.

    The process is intimidating. It requires reliving a traumatic experience with a stranger. For Turner, it meant detailing years of domestic abuse, and she had trouble opening up at first. But once she committed to the process, her victim specialist, Sabrina Martinez, became family.

  • Driver gets four years for crash that killed Hern

    For the Hern family of Evergreen, April 4 marked a new chapter in the story of their grief. That’s because Daltyn Hollon, 21, was sentenced to four years in prison. 

    Hollon was sentenced for a Jan. 20, 2018, one-car accident on Highway 74 where he was driving between 65 and 80 mph in El Rancho when the speed limit is 40 mph. Rachel Hern, who was in the car when Hollon lost control, was ejected and later died from her injuries.

  • Elk Creek Fire looks to halt Conifer development until fees established

    Elk Creek Fire Protection District is asking the Jefferson County commissioners for a moratorium on new development in Conifer — at least until it can establish an impact fee agreement for developers.

    “The developer would pay into a fund that would just be dedicated for … purchasing fire engines or stations or things that are needed as you grow. So that the existing people that live here don’t have to pay for … the impacts of the new development,” said Elk Creek Fire Chief Bill McLaughlin.