.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Outdoors

  • Don’t swat

    Sitting around a picnic table many years ago, I was fascinated by a single yellow jacket tenaciously chewing off bits of lunch meat, smaller than a grain of rice, taking flight and soon returning to leave another divot on the edge of the meat slice. What was she doing with all that bologna?

  • Do I stay or do I go now?

    Even seasoned mountain folks can lose their heads when coming face to face with wildlife. With such an assortment of animals at our doorsteps, close encounters require quick thinking. Do we “look big” or run away? Play dead or fight? How about making eye contact? Here is a rundown of what some experts have to say.

    Bats

  • Should Jeffco reconsider bear-protection ordinances?

    Many years ago, I took my dog into Chow Down, a pet store in Evergreen, for some shopping.  A strapping chocolate Lab puppy, Rontu was traumatized when his leash got tangled with a free-standing rack of pet supplies and pulled it down. No harm done, but the dog refused to enter Chow Down again.
    Imagine that Rontu’s first visit to Chow Down welcomed him, instead, with a delightful food court of strange and wonderful odors, filled to the brim with drool-worthy cuisine. The dog would think of that store as his favorite fast-food restaurant for the rest of his life.

  • Running between the raindrops: perspectives on the skunk

    Few animals are as reviled as the unassuming night dweller, the beautifully coiffed, yet largely invisible skunk. Mostly identified by the telltale odor, the small mammals are hard to spot alive because of their nocturnal habits and shadowy excursions. And yet, there exist glimmers of appreciation of the animal.

  • Let’s hope you are living your life with your head in the clouds

    Nephologists get no respect.  Wikipedia has a complete meltdown about whether the term is still relevant, internet searches might provide, instead, links to “nephrology” (the study of kidneys), and even the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Admin-istration, that bastion of meteorology, gets it wrong, only producing a reference to how kidney disease is affected by climate change.

  • On the Move: Be ready for winter sports

    As I write this it’s chilly and we had our first snow. The snow is almost gone, but thoughts of winter activity is going strong. I personally love to ski, trail run, hike and snowshoe high up in the mountains in winter. I’ve learned from years of being a trainer that my training program makes a big difference in making outdoor activities more enjoyable.

  • The Echo of little ski boots at Clear Creek venue

    If you drop by the newly renovated lodge at Echo Mountain on Wednesday evenings, you might see a spirited passel of kids cruising down the mountain with shiny helmets reflecting the bright spotlights lining the slope.  
    Inside a sparkling, newly renovated lodge, their parents enjoy the inviting fireplace, “really, really good burgers,” and perhaps a frosty beer.

  • Rick, Rascal or Roni: which is the real raccoon?

    Many kids are introduced to raccoons through the popular magazine, “Ranger Rick.” This cartoon park ranger encounters and then solves environmental challenges with the aid of his friends. Through reading about Rick’s quests to defend wildlife and nature, kids are encouraged to also take part in the protection of their natural world.

  • Snow and bikes can be a good combination

    Are they adventure-seeking skiers in pursuit of more outdoor choices for their favorite season? Maybe they are impatient mountain bikers who yearn to be in the saddle, irked that biking season is months away.
    Perhaps these people simply revel in new experiences, welcome a change of pace or just will find any reason to be outside.

  • Technology help for the outdoors

    Surrounded by rugged peaks, wildflower meadows and trout-laden rivers, people living in Colorado revel in the breathtaking — sometimes quite literally — vistas and accompanying recreational choices. Even so, adversity may arise in the high country. Getting lost or injured in remote areas, dodging wildlife on highways or having animal encounters, possibly dangerous, are not uncommon.