.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Lookout Mountain woman sentenced in infant’s death

    Bethany Joy Smith, the Lookout Mountain woman accused of killing her 3-month-old son in May 2016, was sentenced to 17 years in prison last week after pleading guilty on June 29 to one felony charge of negligent child abuse causing death and one felony charge of first-degree assault.

    Smith, 23 also received a mandatory five-year parole sentence, which she will serve at the end of her sentence.

  • Buyers, sellers both can benefit as real estate market starts to balance

    While the foothills real estate market is still strongly favoring sellers, area agents say it’s slowly beginning to cool — a good thing for both buyers and sellers.

    The market here is moving toward being more neutral, especially for homes priced under $2 million, agents say, with some homes selling within hours while others are on the market for several months — a huge change from three years ago when homes were being snapped up at lightning speed.

  • Conifer Historical Society celebrates the Yellow Barn’s 100th birthday

    Anyone who’s made the trek from Evergreen into Conifer knows the cheery barn that stands at the intersection of Barkley Road and Highway 73.

    Now the site of Magpie Mercantile, the barn is hard to miss with its sloping roof and bright yellow paint. On the National Registry of Historic Places since 2014, the Yellow Barn is as rich in history as the numerous families who’ve owned it since it was erected in 1918.

  • WJMS PTA endorses education-focused ballot measures

    The West Jefferson Middle School PTA announced Friday that it will formally support three school funding measures that are on the November ballot, including Amendment 73.

    Amendment 73 is a statewide constitutional amendment which aims to create $1.6 billion in statewide school funding through by raising income taxes for those whose annual income exceeds $150,000, raising the corporate tax rate, and changing how property taxes are assessed for schools.

  • Twenty-three Jeffco students named National Merit semifinalists

    Nearly two dozen Jeffco students have been named as 2019 National Merit Scholarship semifinalists, including five students in the Evergreen and Conifer areas and 10 from South Jeffco schools.

    Announced Thursday, the 23 semifinalists are among 16,000 students recognized nationally and will compete next spring for 7,500 scholarships worth more than $30 million total.

  • Academic performance still mixed for Jeffco

    Academic performance among students in Jeffco Public Schools remains a mixed bag despite efforts to close performance gaps among low-income students, minorities and male students over the past few years.

  • Two mountain-area firefighters pass, remembered for service

    Two longtime firefighters who served the 285 Corridor for more than a decade each have died — one from cancer and another from an aneurysm.

    David Haight

  • Aspen Park lots rezoned for mini-storage

    The Jefferson County Commissioners unanimously approved the rezoning of four lots in Aspen Park to allow for mini-storage.
    According to information provided at last week’s public hearing, three of the four lots that make up the 1.66-acre property located at 9529 Davis Ave. in Conifer were rezoned in 1993 to allow for self-storage. The applicant, Richard Larson, recently proposed rezoning all four lots to allow for self-storage under one official development plan.

  • Comprehensive plan amendment process underway

    Morrison residents at a Sept. 11 community meeting tended to prefer limiting or altogether restricting growth and development in northwest Morrison.

    In a question about whether northwest Morrison is an appropriate location to accommodate growth, 53 percent said no, while 33 percent said yes, if it’s limited.

  • Jeffco eliminating county’s portion of business personal property tax

    Jefferson County commissioners voted 2-1 on Tuesday to eliminate the county’s portion of the business personal property tax, which taxes businesses for goods and products, including equipment.

    The decision will cut nearly $7 million or 1.3 percent of the county’s budget. Commissioners Libby Szabo and Tina Francone — both of whom are business owners — felt strongly in favor of eliminating the tax, while Commissioner Casey Tighe had concerns.