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Local News

  • Morrison approves 2019 budget

    Morrison Town Board unanimously approved its 2019 budget, a more than $2.8 million spending plan that requires a transfer from the town’s reserves.

    Overall, the town has budgeted for $2.45 million in revenue, and approximately $2.87 million in expenditures thus leaving the town with a $416,403 deficit. After transferring money from reserves, Morrison will have just under $4 million remaining in its general fund balance.

  • Morrison PD honors officers at annual awards ceremony

    As Jeremiah Wilbur prepared to leave dinner with his family one night in late October, he noticed a man choking.

    Without hesitation, Wilbur went over to the man and began doing the Heimlich maneuver. Thanks to impeccable timing and Wilbur’s quick thinking, the man was fine.

    “Had it been a minute later, I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have been there,” Wilbur said.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Tourist infraction

  • Crime briefs

    Two men sentenced in 2017 Pine Junction bar fight

    The two men accused of assaulting a father and endangering his daughter at a Pine Junction bar in January 2018 were sentenced to prison on Friday.

  • West Metro trains for surface ice rescues

    A man yells for help from a hole in the ice on Bear Creek Lake. He’s clinging to the ice shelf; his body is cold; he cannot hoist himself out.

    This situation is one that the West Metro Fire Rescue dive team knows how to handle. In fact, it’s precisely what they train for.

  • County manager working to create understanding between vets and local governments

    In nearly two years as Jefferson County manager, Don Davis has made it his mission to bridge the gap between veterans and government workers.

    There’s a special understanding shared by veterans and a special set of skills that make most uniquely qualified for a position in local government. Davis, a former colonel in the United States Marine Corps, understands this better than most, and it’s this perspective that makes him effective in his role as county manager.

  • Vets helping vets:

    In nearly two years as Jefferson County manager, Don Davis has made it his mission to bridge the gap between veterans and government workers.

    There’s a special understanding shared by veterans and a special set of skills that make most uniquely qualified for a position in local government. Davis, a former colonel in the United States Marine Corps, understands this better than most, and it’s this perspective that makes him effective in his role as county manager.

  • Area organizations lend a hand to furloughed federal employees

    As the government shutdown enters into its fourth week, local agencies are stepping up to provide help for furloughed federal employees in the mountain area.

    During a government shutdown, federal agencies must discontinue all non-essential discretionary functions until new funding legislation is passed and signed into law, according to information from the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. Because of this, some 800,000 government employees are without work and without a paycheck and a number of local entities are pitching in to help those in need.

  • Snow much fun: People of all ages enjoy sledding at Meyer Ranch

    Last Friday marked the first big snow of the season, and excitement was in the air the following day as people of all ages packed Meyer Ranch Park with sleds in hand.

    According to the National Weather Service, Conifer had approximately 11 inches of snow by Saturday morning. For many park goers, it was their first trip to the Meyer Ranch sledding hill this season. The parking lot was packed, and dozens trudged through the thick snow hoping for a day of cold weather fun.

  • Five years after a horrific accident, Kai Bianco is thriving as a kindergartner at Wilmot Elementary

    Kai Bianco is a typical 5-year-old: an outgoing, talkative, imaginative, happy kindergartner at Wilmot Elementary School who his teacher calls an ambassador for the class.

    “He is a gift to our classroom,” teacher Kristin Manley said of Kai, who was bitten in the head by the family dog when he was 9 months old. “He greets everybody: kids, teachers, parents. He is the essence of friendship. He notices when kids are sad, and he takes the time to greet you, say “hi,” and remember things about you.”