.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Sports

  • Snowberries make an appearance...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 5, 2012)

    This has been an exceptionally warm, dry fall. We often have nice weather on Thanksgiving, but to have 60-degree days in December is unusual. Moist air coming in from the Pacific Ocean has soaked the West Coast with rain.

    It may reach here by the time this is published, and as it hits the higher mountains, it may well turn to snow. However, that still remains uncertain.

  • Wild turkeys are thankful they’...

    (Reprinted from Nov. 26, 2013)

    While we have many things to be thankful for, I think the wild turkeys must be thankful for being alive because these big, beautiful, wild birds came very close to extinction.

    This great American bird was fairly common over much of America and was taken to Europe in the early 16th century where it was domesticated and became a very popular dish. In America, it was also very popular, but there were no domestic turkeys to buy at the market.

  • Signs warning of thin ice posted...

    Ellen O’Connor, Evergreen Park and Recreation District executive director, has been getting calls from residents concerned about people walking and fishing on the partially frozen surface of Evergreen Lake.

    To help keep people safe and avert an accident, EPRD is posting signs warning of thin ice around the lake. Working with Denver Parks, the Evergreen park district also is creating pamphlets about ice safety that will be placed at key locations at the lake, O’Connor said.

    “We want people to stay safe,” she remarked.

  • Overcoming obstacles

    Shannon Kittelsen was trying not to make mountains out of molehills.

    However, the Evergreen High School sophomore’s mind just wouldn’t stop racing. She tried to tell herself she had a race to prepare for, and she needed to focus her attention on the technicalities of the trail she was attempting to navigate on her mountain bike. The voices of self-doubt in her head grew louder, and the aches in her body joined in the chorus.

  • Evergreen football has set the...

    JOHNSTOWN — It wasn’t the start the visiting Evergreen Cougars wanted or expected facing Roosevelt on a sunny, but freezing Peterson Field on Nov. 21.

  • Cougars nearly perfect in...

    LAKEWOOD — For the second consecutive season Evergreen is headed to the Class 3A football state quarterfinals.

    “I want the kids to enjoy this. Playoff wins are very hard to get,” Evergreen coach Rob Molholm said after the Cougars rolled to a 40-8 victory Nov. 14 against Holy Family at Trailblazer Stadium in Lakewood. “I thought we played the way you have to play to win playoff games. We played ball control and field position.”

  • Remarkable run ends

    DENVER — Evergreen wasn’t just satisfied to make the state volleyball tournament for the first time in two decades.

    The No. 9-seeded Cougars scored back-to-back early-morning victories Nov. 13 and 14 at the Denver Coliseum over higher seeded Holy Family and Montrose to advance into the Class 4A state semifinals Nov. 14.

  • Evergreen stakes claim to soccer...

    By Craig Harper — For the Courier 

    COMMERCE CITY — Members of Evergreen’s 2015 boys soccer team have no direct recollection of the last time the program won a state championship for an obvious reason: They weren’t even a gleam in their parents’ eyes in 1989.

  • New playground equipment...

    Kids are enjoying shiny new playground equipment with special features at Kittredge Park. The recently completed project of the Evergreen Park and Recreation District includes sliding boards, swings and rotating rides for youngsters ages 2 to 12.

    A rock climber and other creative elements such as a raindrop activity panel are included in the design of Evergreen landscape architect Dianne Schade of Made in the Schade.

  • Tree, chipping sparrows visit...

    On her way to visit me last week, my friend Loie Evans saw a tree sparrow in the yard here at Elk Run Assisted Living. Tree sparrows are interesting birds because they do not breed here; they breed much further north. They breed in the low shrub growth just above timberline. They are most frequently seen here in winter in the middle states.

    They are not tree birds as you think of big, high trees. They are birds of the scrub land, nesting in the Hudsonian Zone all across northern Canada, where such trees as birch and alder are more shrub-like, only four to six feet high.