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Today's Sports

  • Pygmy nuthatches regularly...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 30, 2014)

    The birdfeeder below my window is still bringing a variety of birds into view. One of these is the tiny, beloved pygmy nuthatch. Almost daily, a few of these tiny guys are busy gleaning the ponderosa pine above the feeder, gathering insects, which keeps the pines healthy as well as the birds.

  • Goldfinches in winter plumage a...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 20, 2011)

    A pleasant surprise this past week was a letter to the Canyon Courier with photos enclosed of some American goldfinches at a feeder. The photos were taken by Bud and Sandy Madigan at their home feeder in the Upper Bear Creek area. The photos helped me identify the birds.

    American goldfinches are not too easily identified in winter. Their winter plumage is not distinctive, especially in the black-and-white print that was sent to me by the Courier. However, the two light wing bars are distinctive in these little olive drab birds.

  • Kinnikinnick, and winter in the...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 19, 2007)

    Winter seems to have settled in with a fairly stable blanket of white. However, it is not too deep for walking in most of our area, and all but the back roads are fairly passable. This makes it possible for most anyone to get out to see what winter has in store.

  • Where have all the evening...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 7, 2009)

    Probably the question I am most frequently asked by people who have been feeding birds in the area for many years is, “Where have all the grosbeaks gone?” I wish I could give them a good answer, and I also wish I could bring them back.

    First, I try to ascertain that they are referring to the evening grosbeaks because we have other grosbeaks in the area. Usually they describe them as the fairly big birds that are yellow, white and black, and used to come to feeders in droves.

  • Snowberries make an appearance...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 5, 2012)

    This has been an exceptionally warm, dry fall. We often have nice weather on Thanksgiving, but to have 60-degree days in December is unusual. Moist air coming in from the Pacific Ocean has soaked the West Coast with rain.

    It may reach here by the time this is published, and as it hits the higher mountains, it may well turn to snow. However, that still remains uncertain.

  • Wild turkeys are thankful they’...

    (Reprinted from Nov. 26, 2013)

    While we have many things to be thankful for, I think the wild turkeys must be thankful for being alive because these big, beautiful, wild birds came very close to extinction.

    This great American bird was fairly common over much of America and was taken to Europe in the early 16th century where it was domesticated and became a very popular dish. In America, it was also very popular, but there were no domestic turkeys to buy at the market.

  • Signs warning of thin ice posted...

    Ellen O’Connor, Evergreen Park and Recreation District executive director, has been getting calls from residents concerned about people walking and fishing on the partially frozen surface of Evergreen Lake.

    To help keep people safe and avert an accident, EPRD is posting signs warning of thin ice around the lake. Working with Denver Parks, the Evergreen park district also is creating pamphlets about ice safety that will be placed at key locations at the lake, O’Connor said.

    “We want people to stay safe,” she remarked.

  • New playground equipment...

    Kids are enjoying shiny new playground equipment with special features at Kittredge Park. The recently completed project of the Evergreen Park and Recreation District includes sliding boards, swings and rotating rides for youngsters ages 2 to 12.

    A rock climber and other creative elements such as a raindrop activity panel are included in the design of Evergreen landscape architect Dianne Schade of Made in the Schade.

  • Tree, chipping sparrows visit...

    On her way to visit me last week, my friend Loie Evans saw a tree sparrow in the yard here at Elk Run Assisted Living. Tree sparrows are interesting birds because they do not breed here; they breed much further north. They breed in the low shrub growth just above timberline. They are most frequently seen here in winter in the middle states.

    They are not tree birds as you think of big, high trees. They are birds of the scrub land, nesting in the Hudsonian Zone all across northern Canada, where such trees as birch and alder are more shrub-like, only four to six feet high.

  • Jeffco Open Space revises...

    To better manage events in its parks, Jeffco Open Space is establishing new guidelines, which the Open Space Advisory Committee reviewed on Nov. 5.

    Events attended by more than 200 people will be limited to five per year, with a maximum of one for each user type, said Dave Davenport, Open Space’s outdoor recreation coordinator.

    Also, events that fall on holidays or holiday weekends will not be considered, according to the revised park-permit guidelines.