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Today's Sports

  • Evergreen completes late-season...

    Ask Evergreen girls basketball coach Amy Bahl, and she’ll tell you that the Longmont Lady Trojans were a really good No. 6 seed. Maybe they shouldn’t have been a sixth seed at all considering Longmont did share the 4A Northern League title with Thompson Valley and Silver Creek. Unfortunately, the Lady Cougars found out just how tough Longmont really was.

    The Lady Trojans upset third-seeded Evergreen, 57-51, in the opening round of the Tanya Haave Region of the 4A state tournament on Feb. 27 at the Southwest Motors Event Center.

  • Kadets bounce Cougars

    Host Air Academy outscored Evergreen, 24-12, in the fourth quarter as the second-seeded Kadets stormed past No. 7 Evergreen, 68-47, in the opening round of the 4A state tournament at Air Academy High School in Colorado Springs on Feb. 27.

    Air Academy (21-4), which advanced to the Great Eight with a 64-54 win over Pueblo Central the next day, led 26-16 at halftime. Luke Camp led Evergreen (15-9) with 18 points. 

  • Boulder raspberry a good shrub...

    Many readers of this column have asked for suggestions on the best trees and shrubs to plant in landscaping their homes in this area. If you need large trees, there is nothing better than the native ponderosa pine, blue spruce and Douglas fir.

    However, the blue spruce and Douglas fir need a bit more water and do their best in a ravine on a north slope, while a ponderosa pine will grow on a south slope. All of these or any other trees will need extra water for the first two to three years until they become established.

  • Foothills offer plant...

    The various plant communities that make up part of any biological study are usually the most interesting part to me. I took my first course in ecology in the summer of 1937. At that time, ecology was considered a new science concerning the interrelationship between the many things found in a wildlife community.

  • Pasque flowers, hummingbirds...

    Spring in here! No matter how much more snow may still fall, spring is here. My friend and neighbor, Karel Buckley, called me on Monday evening, April 6, too late to make last week’s column, to tell me she had seen her first pasque flower in bloom on Sunday, April 5, and had heard her first hummingbird on the next day, Monday, April 6. These are the two species that people ask about and look for to establish the arrival of spring.

  • Wildflowers peek out through...

    Once more, I awakened to a white world. Yesterday, the landscape was offering green lawns in Lakewood and the foothills were starting to show green, small leaves just beginning to be seen between the dry gray-brown grasses. Snow overnight had changed this all to white again.

  • Woodpeckers make appearance at...

    Today brought both a hairy and downy woodpecker to the feeder outside my window. Although it is not a suet feeder, the black-oil sunflower seeds that were in the mixed seeds at the feeder seemed to meet their needs. The hairy and downy woodpeckers are often confused because they are similarly patterned, black-and-white woodpeckers, but they are very different in size.

    Both birds are found widely spread across America, very much alike except in the Pacific Northwest, where the white on the birds are not a clean pure white but is instead more grayish-brownish white.

  • First spring migrants appear in...

    As March draws to a close, it feels more like spring every day. I love this time of year when winter slowly loses its grip on the land, and spring gets closer every day.

    Some days when the sky is blue and the temperature rises well above 60 degrees, you feel like spring is already here. Those of us who have lived here for awhile know better; we also know it may snow tomorrow, and it will be a long time still before Elk Meadow looks green instead of grayish-tan.

  • Many local trees from willow...

    The willow family, Salicaceae, contains many of the deciduous trees found locally. Most everyone has learned to recognize the quaking aspen, the trees that turn our falls into a golden splendor. These and a few others are in the genus populus.

  • Owls help keep rodent population...

    The great horned owl is probably the most common owl in the Evergreen area. A few of the smaller owls may be nearly as common during their brief breeding period, but the great horned owl is a permanent resident in local areas where adequate food and nesting sites are available.