.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Sports

  • Cougars finding their way after...

    WHEAT RIDGE — First-year Evergreen High boys swimming coach Marc Rios has taken a hands-off approach early on in the 2015 season. He’s gone as far as to let the Cougars choose which events they want to swim in. That was the case in Evergreen’s tri-meet at Wheat Ridge Rec Center on March 13 along with the host Farmers and Ralston Valley, in which the Cougars placed second with 97 points.

  • 4A Jeffco all-conference girls...

    The following are the 2014-15 4A Jeffco League all-conference girls swimming and wrestling teams:

  • Common house wren sings its...

    When I stretched out on my bed on the afternoon of May 12, I had only intended to rest my old back for a few minutes. But of course, I fell asleep. I was awakened about 20 minutes later by the bubbling song of a house wren.

    It had been an exceptionally warm day, and I had my windows open a few inches. The house wren sang again, this time louder than before. It was sitting on my windowsill, singing his welcome to the fine spring day.

  • Boating season opens at...

    Boating season at Evergreen Lake has opened with limited hours of operation on weekends until Memorial Day weekend, when the summer schedule begins.

    Paddle boats, kayaks, fishing boats and sailboats are available for renting at hourly rates.

    Stand-up paddle boarding also will be offered to visitors again this season. Evergreen Park and Recreation District staff are overseeing this popular activity this year, rather than using the services of a vendor as in previous years, said Ellen O’Connor, EPRD executive director.

  • White-breasted nuthatches begin...

    Almost everyone who has a bird feeder in a wooded area has a pair or two of white-breasted nuthatches coming to it. Although some books refer to them as being entirely insectivorous, I have watched them eat sunflower seeds at my feeders.

  • Boulder raspberry a good shrub...

    Many readers of this column have asked for suggestions on the best trees and shrubs to plant in landscaping their homes in this area. If you need large trees, there is nothing better than the native ponderosa pine, blue spruce and Douglas fir.

    However, the blue spruce and Douglas fir need a bit more water and do their best in a ravine on a north slope, while a ponderosa pine will grow on a south slope. All of these or any other trees will need extra water for the first two to three years until they become established.

  • Foothills offer plant...

    The various plant communities that make up part of any biological study are usually the most interesting part to me. I took my first course in ecology in the summer of 1937. At that time, ecology was considered a new science concerning the interrelationship between the many things found in a wildlife community.

  • Pasque flowers, hummingbirds...

    Spring in here! No matter how much more snow may still fall, spring is here. My friend and neighbor, Karel Buckley, called me on Monday evening, April 6, too late to make last week’s column, to tell me she had seen her first pasque flower in bloom on Sunday, April 5, and had heard her first hummingbird on the next day, Monday, April 6. These are the two species that people ask about and look for to establish the arrival of spring.

  • Wildflowers peek out through...

    Once more, I awakened to a white world. Yesterday, the landscape was offering green lawns in Lakewood and the foothills were starting to show green, small leaves just beginning to be seen between the dry gray-brown grasses. Snow overnight had changed this all to white again.

  • Woodpeckers make appearance at...

    Today brought both a hairy and downy woodpecker to the feeder outside my window. Although it is not a suet feeder, the black-oil sunflower seeds that were in the mixed seeds at the feeder seemed to meet their needs. The hairy and downy woodpeckers are often confused because they are similarly patterned, black-and-white woodpeckers, but they are very different in size.

    Both birds are found widely spread across America, very much alike except in the Pacific Northwest, where the white on the birds are not a clean pure white but is instead more grayish-brownish white.