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Today's Sports

  • All-conference football teams

    3A WEST METRO
    FIRST TEAM

  • Lady Lobos pick up their first...

    ARVADA — There were plenty of reasons to be pessimistic. Showing up to the game late. Opening up in a 2-0 hole after a technical was called for wearing the wrong-colored jerseys. Falling behind 8-2 early on. 

    It was far from the kind of start the Conifer Lady Lobos would’ve preferred.

    But head coach Cara Walderman wasn’t too concerned with any of that. If anything, she was taking the blame for it.

  • Evergreen dominant at Jeffco ...

    LITTLETON — Though the 200 individual medley is one of Tyler McMonigle’s favorite races, it’s also a difficult one to transition out of each stroke. That’s because the Evergreen High junior has to cope with scoliosis, a condition she’s had since birth.

    The first 50 yards of the individual medley — the butterfly — can be difficult, she said.

  • Dinegar, Jaguars pull away from...

    DENVER — Just 3 minutes into the game and Charles Dinegar was already having himself a game. The D’Evelyn junior had scored the team’s first nine points and was creating a defensive mismatch for the Conifer Lobos on Dec. 16. That’s when Conifer employed a 1-3-1 zone intended to slow Dinegar down.

  • 2016-17 skiing capsule previews

    EVERGREEN COUGARS
    Head coaches: Jarod Roberts (alpine), Holly Boggs (Nordic)
    Assistant coaches: David Howell (alpine), Mike Savoie (Nordic), Blake Ridgeway (Nordic)

  • You can help with Great Backyard...

    (Reprinted from March 4, 2009)

    Editor’s note: This year’s Great Backyard Bird Count will be Feb. 17-20)

    I have just mailed in a count for the Great Backyard Bird Count to the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology at Ithaca, N.Y. This count is a joint effort of the Laboratory of Ornithology and Audubon. It is such an easy count to do that I thought some of you might be interested in taking part next year.

  • Red-winged blackbirds are a...

    (Reprinted from Feb. 6, 2008)

    Usually cold and wintry, February is made bearable by the first signs of spring — nothing as showy as the first daffodil in bloom, but still good, dependable signs of spring.

  • Shrikes common in foothills,...

    (Reprinted from Jan. 23, 2008)

    For some time now, the birds at our feeders have been nervous, flying into the prickly thickness of a nearby blue spruce or darting into the lilac bushes every time anything moves in the yard or even inside the window. Such behavior, especially in cold, snowy weather, can mean only one thing. There is a predator of some kind working in the area. But what kind? That is the question.

  • The final fate of Frances the...

    Several readers of this column have inquired recently if I knew what had become of “Frances” the Canada goose that lingered at Evergreen Lake into winter. Since I had suggested that the people who were concerned about Frances should call Carol Wade, I called her last week to find out what had transpired.

  • Winter cottonwoods and a new...

    Reprinted from Dec. 31, 2008

    The good news is that the winter solstice marks the shortest day of the year. From now on, each day grows a bit longer until the spring equinox brings equal days and nights, the official beginning of spring.

    Actually, the first signs of spring appear long before March 21. Easter daises will be found blooming in February, early migrant birds will begin to move, and the twigs of the cottonwoods and willows will begin to glow with color as sap rises upward to nourish buds and soon-to-be flowers and leaves.