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Today's Sports

  • Grise’s RBI double lifts...

    By Craig Harper
    For the Courier

  • Sports briefs

    BOYS SWIMMING 
    Carder places seventh in the 500 freestyle at state
    THORNTON — Evergreen High senior Zack Carder took seventh place in the 500-yard freestyle and 12th in the 200 freestyle at the 4A boys swimming state championships at the Veterans Memorial Aquatic Center on May 16.

    Carder saw a time of 4 minutes, 57.36 seconds in the 500 freestyle, while he finished the 200 freestyle in 1:48.62.

    He scored all 17 of his team’s points as Evergreen placed 23rd.

  • Searching for nocturnal animals...

    One of the more common frogs in this area is the northern chorus frog. These little frogs are very small – only about an inch and a half high when sitting – and prefer temporary spring ponds that are very shallow.

    They are sometimes referred to as spring peepers, but this is a misnomer. The spring peeper is a different kind of frog that is a tree frog and usually peeps singly up in a tree.

    The chorus frog is well named for there is usually a large chorus of them all singing together “cre-ee-k, cre-ee-k, cre-ee-k in a shallow grassy puddle.

  • Four more hummingbirds...

    Last week I wrote about the two most common hummingbirds seen locally, the broad-tailed and the rufous.

    Broad-tailed hummingbirds usually arrive in April and nest here. Rufous hummingbirds, which have gone north along the Pacific coast in early spring, have nested as far north as southern Alaska and return south along the mountains where there are still wildflowers.

  • July is a good time to learn...

    Many people have reported to me that the ruby-throated hummingbirds have returned.

    Still others tell me rufous hummingbirds are back and not as feisty as usual. All of these people mean well, but they are somewhat confused about our fascinating hummingbirds.

  • Kids take the bait at Outdoor...

    Young people experienced the joy and frustration of fishing at the annual Outdoor Skills Day at Evergreen Lake recently.

    Children tall and small received rods and reels from Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and got help with attaching bait and bobbers. The kids stood along the bank of the lake near the Evergreen Nature Center, flocked by parents, Evergreen Trout Unlimited members and rangers, who helped them with casting and reeling in their lines.

  • Rare and interesting ferns grow...

    Ferns are not what one could call abundant in Colorado, but we have a few, including some that are rare and interesting.

    The large stands of tall ferns found in the moist, rich eastern woodlands are not to be found in our dry climate, but we do have some rock and cliff dwellers as well as a few that grow in the sub-alpine bogs and meadows.

    The most common fern in the Evergreen area is the delicate brittle fern, Cystoperis fragilis. The stipe or stem of this fern is dark brown to black at the base, shading to straw color or green.

  • Warblers’ beautiful songs fill...

    I can hear what I believe to be a yellow warbler singing, but I haven’t seen it yet, so I am not positive of my identification because I don’t trust my ears. Unfortunately, my hearing is not what it used to be.

  • Volunteers improve Saddleback...

    After hiking up a steep slope with two heavy containers of water, crew leader Lauren Riegler of Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado coordinated efforts to develop a trail on Saddleback Mountain on Friday.

    Divided into four groups, 49 volunteers cleared overgrown sections of the trail leading to the summit and installed steps to divert water away from the path and make hiking easier. During the seven hours they worked, volunteers placed 88 check steps and worked on more than 1,000 feet of trail on the mountain, Riegler said.

  • June’s showers bring July’s...

    There is an old saying in this area: “When it rains in June, the mariposa lilies will bloom in July.” Well, it certainly has rained in June, so now we can look forward to seeing mariposa lilies in July.