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Today's Sports

  • First spring migrants appear in...

    As March draws to a close, it feels more like spring every day. I love this time of year when winter slowly loses its grip on the land, and spring gets closer every day.

    Some days when the sky is blue and the temperature rises well above 60 degrees, you feel like spring is already here. Those of us who have lived here for awhile know better; we also know it may snow tomorrow, and it will be a long time still before Elk Meadow looks green instead of grayish-tan.

  • Many local trees from willow...

    The willow family, Salicaceae, contains many of the deciduous trees found locally. Most everyone has learned to recognize the quaking aspen, the trees that turn our falls into a golden splendor. These and a few others are in the genus populus.

  • Owls help keep rodent population...

    The great horned owl is probably the most common owl in the Evergreen area. A few of the smaller owls may be nearly as common during their brief breeding period, but the great horned owl is a permanent resident in local areas where adequate food and nesting sites are available.

  • American dippers are the area’s...

    When walking in the parking lot in downtown Evergreen on a snowy winter day, you may hear a bubbling bird song. It you are so fortunate, sit quietly along the bank of Bear Creek and listen.

    You are not hearing some unfortunate canary that someone has left out in the cold, but you are hearing one of our most unusual songbirds, the American dipper.

  • Plans for second community...

    A community garden planned at Wilmot Elementary School is receiving cautious support from the Evergreen Park and Recreation District. To land funding, Evergreen’s Alliance for Sustainability needs the district to submit a grant request to Great Outdoors Colorado.

  • Storksbill blooms may be seen in...

    Once more, a fine snow is drifting down on the meadows that surround me. Elk Run Assisted Living is located in an offshoot of the Elk Meadow Open Space area.

    I watched the fog move across the meadow and as usual this time of year, it brought another snowstorm with it. The grasses in the meadow are dry, tan or yellow, with nary a sign of spring green.

  • No matter how you spell it, it’s...

    I don’t know how to write this article about bluebirds, blue birds, Blue birds or Blue Birds found in this area. All four spellings plus a hyphenated form are found in various bird books. I, myself, prefer the single word of bluebird.

    Friends returning last week from Santa Fe told me they had seen bluebirds eating juniper just south of the state line in New Mexico. My friends thought the birds were on their way back for the summer. They well may have been.

  • Streams near ski area eyed as...

    Endangered greenback cutthroat trout could get a new home in the Herman Gulch and Dry Gulch streams north of Loveland Ski Area.

    State Parks and Wildlife officials want to make way for Colorado’s state fish to reproduce in those streams by removing other fish populations there. Biologists plan to start the project sometime in February, according to Jennifer Churchill, a spokeswoman for Parks and Wildlife. Several of the officials discussed the project with Clear Creek’s county commissioners at a recent meeting.

  • First phase of Peaks to Plains...

    The first phase of the Peaks to Plains Trail in the Jeffco portion of Clear Creek Canyon is nearly completed, said Scot Grossman, Jeffco Open Space project manager.

    “All that’s missing is some railing,” Grossman said during his report to the Jeffco Open Space Advisory Committee on Feb. 5.

  • Hiwan Museum, Lookout Mountain...

    Dressed in period attire, John Steinle, history education supervisor for Jeffco Open Space, was talking about volunteer opportunities at the Hiwan Homestead Museum on Saturday. Volunteers are needed as tour guides, receptionists and history educators at the museum, Steinle told attendees at a volunteer recruitment fair at the Jeffco Open Space office in Golden. Standing beside Steinle was Alicia Vermilye of the Lookout Mountain Nature Center, who was looking for volunteer naturalists.