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Today's Sports

  • Townsend’s solitaires enjoy...

    If you are lucky enough to have a cedar or juniper tree in your yard that has a good crop of blue berries, then you are likely to have winter birds coming to the feast. The small tree that for years has been known as the Rocky Mountain juniper now seems to be called a cedar and has me as well as many other confused.

  • Pygmy nuthatches regularly...

    The birdfeeder below my window is still bringing a variety of birds into view. One of these is the tiny, beloved pygmy nuthatch. Almost daily, a few of these tiny guys are busy gleaning the ponderosa pine above the feeder, gathering insects, which keeps the pines healthy as well as the birds.

  • Holly grape leaves make nice...

    As I write this, it is Sunday, Dec. 21. In only four more days, it will be Christmas. It is so difficult to keep on a schedule in a place like this, where all the days are so much alike. I lost a whole day this week, and I thought this was Saturday morning until I discovered it was Sunday, and I had an article due. As usual, a deadline is a deadline, and I must rush this out before noon.

  • View from Colorado’s ‘park’...

    I am still at Elk Run, where I can receive some assistance when needed. When I look out the windows to the north, I can see the open meadows of Elk Meadow Open Space. When I look east or south, I can see the semi-open areas of widely scattered ponderosa pines across the grassy meadows, beyond which the trees grow closer to each other and a forest is formed.

  • Starlings light up feeders...

    Early December is a dreary time of year. Winter has taken a fairly good grip on the land. Our landscape becomes mostly black and white. It is cold, and few exciting or unusual birds are to be seen.

    Only the hardiest winter birds come to the feeders. The fall migrant birds have all passed through. The year-round residents that exist here in the mountains are relatively few. The hairy and downy woodpeckers still appear, dressed in black and white except for a small red patch on the nape of the male, so they blend right into the winter landscape

  • Elegant waxwings grace winter...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 7, 2011)

    Many people complain to me that they find winter birding dull because there are no pretty birds around.

    True, the winter residents at most feeders, pine siskins, chickadees, nuthatches, hairy and down woodpeckers, house sparrows, house finches, and the various forms of the dark-eyed junco are mostly gray, brown, and black-and-white birds. Not very exciting or colorful, but they are still interesting.

  • Currants make a tasty meal for...

    Beneath the ponderosa pine that grows outside my window is a wax or squaw currant bush, Ribes cereum. This shrub is probably one of the most important plants that grows in the foothills.

    The fact that the berries turn a wax-like orange-red when ripe accounts for the common name of wax currant. The other common name of squaw currant simply refers to an old name for the Native American women who used these berries in many ways. Although tart, with the addition of a little sugar they make a tasty jelly or sauce.

  • Snow, migrating birds drift in...

    There are many who complain that the weather forecasters on television never predict the weather correctly.

    However, they were right on this past week when they predicted that a cold front would arrive on the afternoon of Monday, Nov. 10, and that it would remain for four days.

  • Plans for Winter Sports Center...

    There will be no sledding and no Nordic track at the Evergreen Golf Course this winter, after the Evergreen Park and Recreation District abandoned a plan to make the programs come to fruition.

    EPRD had been in talks with course owner Denver Parks and Recreation to lease the golf course and pro shop for $500 for the winter season, said Brad Bednar, Evergreen Lake House supervisor.

  • Cross-country ski trail proposed...

    An Olympics-sanctioned cross-country ski trail could be created this winter on Old Squaw Pass Road and other roads near Echo Mountain Resort.

    Supporters want the trail to run from the privately owned Echo Mountain on Colorado 103 west to Echo Lake at the base of Mount Evans, according to Nora Pykkonen, owner of the ski area. Members of the U.S.  Olympic Committee have looked at the proposed trail to see if it would be a suitable venue for a race, she said.