.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Sports

  • EHS finding a rhythm through...

    LAKEWOOD — It started May 29 with a three-day team camp at Metro State, then a summer series at Gold Crown, a camp at the University of Northern Colorado and now a final camp at Gold Crown Field House. 

    It’s just a little more than three weeks, but the Evergreen Cougars’ boys basketball team gets a small sampling of what kind of squad it has when it goes into the 2015-16 season later this year.

  • 2015 spring sports all-...

    The following are all-conference selections for the 2015 spring sports season:

  • Goldfinches shy away from...

    Many years ago, I saw my first lesser goldfinch in a yard in Idledale. When I first saw this little yellow-and-black bird, it was acting like a new warbler. That’s what I thought it was.

    I could not find any warbler that looked like it, and then noticed its thick finch-like beak. This sent me to the yellow finches, and there it was among the many goldfinches that occur here: the lesser black-backed goldfinch.

  • Eagle sighted at Evergreen Lake...

    Many people have reported the sighting of an adult bald eagle that has visited Evergreen Lake several times this summer. I even saw it myself when a friend was driving me down Highway 74 one day last week.

    The eagle was too high and it was poorly lighted, so I could not actually see its white head and tail, but I knew it was an eagle by the soaring bird’s very flat appearance. They look like they were cut out of a piece of cardboard. Red-tailed hawks and other large birds that you might confuse it with have must more bend in their wings.

  • Ivy, sumac and some poisons to...

    The first bit of fall color to appear in the Bear Creek Valley is the lovely orange-red of poison ivy, Toxicodendron rydbergii. Its unique color often appears to be in small clumps along the canyon walls, announcing the end of summer and the beginning of fall. One can hardly call the color red, for it is almost orange, an unusual color in the changing fall panorama.

  • Residents concerned about sport...

    Old Squaw Pass Road resident David Grasso is worried enough about sport shooting on public land near his home that he's thinking about moving.

    "I don't want to sit at my kitchen table and get hit by a bullet," Grasso told a reporter. "It's kind of dangerous here. I've lived here 40 years, and I've had it."

  • House finches, other species...

    Mid-August and instead of the lazy days of hot summer, it has been relatively warm days and good-sleeping cool nights. Sitting out in front of Elk Run Assisted Living, I watched two house finches bring their young to the feeder as well as seeing one adult American robin trying to find a place damp enough to provide one angleworm to feed his one youngster.

    Although nearly full size, the immature robin still sported enough speckles on his breast to identify him and to show his age as a young member of the thrush family.

  • Wildflowers abundant in late...

    One of the most common roadside flowers of the late summer and early autumn is the yellow sweet-clover, Melilotus officinale. The common roadside plant, oddly enough, is not a native.

    According to the books that I have, the white sweet clover is a native, but the yellow was introduced from Europe because it was known to be both a good honey and forage plant. It is also known as honey clover and yellow melilot.

  • The dawn of a fitness class

    It was a chilly 46 degrees at 6 a.m. last Thursday when a half-dozen hardy souls appeared on the Evergreen High School football field to exercise — just as the sun was rising.

    They jogged, did pushups, stretched and lunged, all while breathing the fresh air, viewing outdoor Evergreen and hearing music from a small sound system. About halfway through the 60-minute class, the sun became visible above the treetops.

  • Searching for nocturnal animals...

    One of the more common frogs in this area is the northern chorus frog. These little frogs are very small – only about an inch and a half high when sitting – and prefer temporary spring ponds that are very shallow.

    They are sometimes referred to as spring peepers, but this is a misnomer. The spring peeper is a different kind of frog that is a tree frog and usually peeps singly up in a tree.

    The chorus frog is well named for there is usually a large chorus of them all singing together “cre-ee-k, cre-ee-k, cre-ee-k in a shallow grassy puddle.