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Today's Sports

  • Evergreen Rodeo continues legacy

    By Adam Sullivan

    Sports  Editor

    Evergreen Rodeo president Dave Marshall stood near the press box on Sunday afternoon with a big smile on his face. Marshall’s daughter had just been named queen for the 2018 Evergreen Rodeo, but another reason to smile was the huge crowd turnout both days.

  • Hibler born to dominate

    By Adam Sullivan

    Sports  Editor

    As Zach Hibler mounted his horse for the bareback competition on Sunday afternoon at the Evergreen Rodeo, he had one thing on his mind: dominate.

    “The lord made us to dominate,” explained Hibler. “That’s the one thing I think about before that gate swings open. All we can do is just do our best and give all the glory to him.”

  • From Australia to Colorado:...

    By Adam Sullivan

    Sports  Editor

    Jamie Howlett sat by himself under the press box Sunday afternoon, removing his gear following a third attempt in the bareback competition. Sweat was still dripping down his face, his hand wrapped tight after his horse fell on him in his first attempt. With all of the distractions around, Howlett had one thing on his mind.

  • Jennifer Barbour displays...

    By Christie Greene

     For  the Courier

    BAILEY — In the summer of 2015, Jennifer Barbour stepped up to the stage where an announcer stood, microphone in hand,  reading names of the event’s champion, category by category.  

  • Wildfires are a reset button for...

    Several years have elapsed since Colorado’s foothills have seen significant fires, but the haze that persisted over our skies reminds us that the danger of forest fires is real. We worry about homes, pets and memories. But with wildfire as the most serious threat to our state, what happens to the wild animals when the fires ignite and begin rapidly spreading along with its acrid smoke and extreme heat?
    For pets and livestock, there are plans in place.

  • Learning to fly – fish that is

    “There’s no sensation to compare with this. Suspended animation, a state of bliss.” — Pink Floyd, lyrics from “Learning to Fly.”

    Pink Floyd may not have written “Learning to Fly” about fly-fishing, but plenty of anglers partially submerged in the frigid waters of Colorado rivers would happily describe the sport as definitely imparting “a state of bliss.”

  • In the dark with the eclipse
  • Flutter of butterflies and...

    By Christie Greene

    Some readers only buy non-fiction books on the grounds that nothing is more riveting than real-life events. Certain news stories result in rueful head shaking, meaning “you can’t make this stuff up.” On occasion, the term “fake news” might be employed to express doubt about the origin of information. Let me assure you that the “terms of venary” below may be hard to take seriously, and yet, they were a status symbol in the 13th and 14th centuries.

    ‘A group of children is called a migraine.’

  • Rolling Stones, ghosts and the...

    Christie Greene

    In addition to living in the midst of some of the most spectacular scenery and wildlife viewing in the state, Denver’s foothills residents also enjoy close proximity to one of the country’s most famous and beloved outdoor event venues.
    Red Rocks has been touted as the country’s best outdoor amphitheatre by Rolling Stone Magazine, though the Rolling Stones, themselves, have never played there.

  • What a nice bell you have

    By Christie Greene

    What’s up with that baggy skin hanging under the chin of a moose? Is it fat, maybe from eating a few too many twigs? Maybe it’s attractive to other moose. Biologists are unsure what the purpose of the bell really is, but there are many hypotheses about why the moose grows one.

    The females may judge the size of the bell, as they do the size of antlers, to determine the bull’s fitness as a mate. Perhaps it is part of the male’s mating ritual of spraying urine, which splashes onto the bell.