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Today's Sports

  • Spinal scoliosis doesn’t slow...

    By Chelsy Woods Klein — For the Courier

    EVERGREEN — Water is a great source of magnification.

    Maggie Hellard, a co-captain on Evergreen’s girls swimming and diving team this season, has gone through a lot under the microscope of water while being a key cog for the two-time defending Class 4A state champions.

    Hellard, an Evergreen resident who is homeschooled, was diagnosed with spinal scoliosis — a condition characterized by an abnormal curve in the spine.

  • Pygmy nuthatches regularly...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 30, 2014)

    The birdfeeder below my window is still bringing a variety of birds into view. One of these is the tiny, beloved pygmy nuthatch. Almost daily, a few of these tiny guys are busy gleaning the ponderosa pine above the feeder, gathering insects, which keeps the pines healthy as well as the birds.

  • Top sports stories of 2015

    EVERGREEN — It will likely go down in history as the most successful year athletically for Evergreen High School.

    The Cougars put on a show in 2015, winning two team state titles. Boys soccer claimed Evergreen’s first boys team championship since 1989. Then, of course, there was the Cougars’ girls swim and dive team that repeated as Class 4A state champs.

  • Goldfinches in winter plumage a...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 20, 2011)

    A pleasant surprise this past week was a letter to the Canyon Courier with photos enclosed of some American goldfinches at a feeder. The photos were taken by Bud and Sandy Madigan at their home feeder in the Upper Bear Creek area. The photos helped me identify the birds.

    American goldfinches are not too easily identified in winter. Their winter plumage is not distinctive, especially in the black-and-white print that was sent to me by the Courier. However, the two light wing bars are distinctive in these little olive drab birds.

  • Kisiel reaches 1,000th career...

    By Craig Harper — For the Courier

    EVERGREEN — Since her freshman year at Evergreen, Samantha Kisiel set her sights on two primary basketball accomplishments: help the Cougars win a state championship and reach 1,000 points in scoring.

    Put a check by the latter.

    The senior center attained the individual milestone in the first quarter of Evergreen’s 57-31 victory over Silver Creek on Dec. 16.

  • Swimming into historic territory

    By Chelsy Woods Klein — For the Courier

    EVERGREEN —Evergreen High School might appear as an unassuming mountain school better suited to churn out skiers than swimmers.

    However, the Cougars entered the 2015-16 girls swim season as two-time defending Class 4A state champions. To fully appreciate just how good Evergreen has been in the water, one must look back at the team’s history.

  • Williams weighs in for Evergreen

    By Craig Harper — For the Courier

    EVERGREEN — For the past two years, Connor Williams wrestled in the lowest weight classification at a severe disadvantage.

    The Evergreen junior regularly conceded about 20 pounds to opponents in the 106-pound division as a freshman and sophomore, but somehow held his own and posted a winning record in 2014-15.

    This season the scales are balanced. Williams remains at 106 but has added about 20 pounds to reach the limit.

  • Cougars rally to edge Denver West

    LAKEWOOD — Evergreen senior Brady Bokelman knows when to give up an uncontested layup.

    Denver West sophomore Nahum Berhe drove past Bokelman to put in the final shot at the buzzer. The problem Berhe and the Cowboys had was the Cougars had a three-point lead. All the layup did was give Evergreen a 54-53 victory Dec. 10 in the opening round of the Paul Davis Classic at Green Mountain High School.

  • Kinnikinnick, and winter in the...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 19, 2007)

    Winter seems to have settled in with a fairly stable blanket of white. However, it is not too deep for walking in most of our area, and all but the back roads are fairly passable. This makes it possible for most anyone to get out to see what winter has in store.

  • Where have all the evening...

    (Reprinted from Dec. 7, 2009)

    Probably the question I am most frequently asked by people who have been feeding birds in the area for many years is, “Where have all the grosbeaks gone?” I wish I could give them a good answer, and I also wish I could bring them back.

    First, I try to ascertain that they are referring to the evening grosbeaks because we have other grosbeaks in the area. Usually they describe them as the fairly big birds that are yellow, white and black, and used to come to feeders in droves.