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Outdoors

  • Remembering Clarence, a Capitol fixture

    There are people we encounter in life who achieve notoriety and influence beyond what any reasonable person would expect. Clarence Miller, who passed away last week at the age of 64, was one of those people.

  • Differentiating between crows, ravens a matter of sight, sound

    This past week has brought us more spring-like weather with temperatures in the high 50s and the melting of what little snow we had left. Once more, my feeders are deserted by the juncos, which obviously prefer seeds that they can find in the fields to what I offer them at the feeders. They do eat the white proso millet when the fields are covered with snow.

  • Starlings showing up at feeders

    Every winter, I receive a phone call or letter from someone, asking about the strange beautiful bird at a feeder. Apparently, the unusually cold weather gives starlings the drive to investigate feeders, and many people see them for the first time during the cold days of winter.

  • Open space advisory board recommends more than $1 million in park grants

    The Evergreen Park and Recreation District is among potential recipients of grants recommended by the Jefferson County Open Space Advisory Committee. If approved by the county commissioners, the park district will receive $79,000 to improve and rebuild the boardwalk and nature center access trail at Evergreen Lake.

    Other recommended grant recipients include the cities of Golden, Lakewood and Wheat Ridge, which collectively could receive the lion’s share of more than $800,000 from the Jeffco Open Space sales tax fund.

  • Jeffco Open Space sets goals for completing repairs to flood-damaged parks

    With help from volunteers, Apex Park may be partially open to hikers and bikers by this spring, according to a timeline established by the staff at Jeffco Open Space.

    The park in Golden has been closed since September, when flooding caused extensive trail damage. Other parks in the Jeffco Open Space system, which also were severely impacted, are slated for repairs in the coming months.

  • Dove sightings becoming common

    During the holidays, I received word from a reader of this column, Brian Parsons, that he had what he believed to be a pair of turtle doves at his feeder south of Evergreen. He described the birds as being “a pair of light-colored doves with a black neck ring.”

     

    I talked to Mr. Parsons on the phone, but I have not as yet been able to see the birds myself. His description could be either of two birds, both of which have been seen in Colorado in the past.

  • $49,000 grant secured for Evergreen Trails Master Plan

    The Evergreen Trails Master Plan project took an important step recently when it received a $49,000 grant from Great Outdoors Colorado.

    The plan envisions a trail network running from the high school to Wulf Rec Center to the Evergreen Library, and then through downtown along Bear Creek.

  • Gray-colored birds visit feeders during winter

    Reprinted from Jan. 6, 2010

    It is winter again this week. Snowflakes have been in the air several times, but so far, we haven’t accumulated much, just added clean sheets to the snow bed that was already on the ground.

  • Kinnikinnick provides green during gray of winter season

    Green is not a color you expect to see this time of year when you look out the window. Ponderosa pines are nearly totally dormant and give an appearance of being black when seen against the snow.

  • Counting crows … and a few other winter birds

    "Another crow! There’s too many to count,” Hannah Crangle said while gazing into the wintry sky on Saturday morning.

    Hannah was the lone but enthusiastic participant in Evergreen Audubon’s first Kids Bird Count. Surrounded by Audubon members, the young girl was checking out the area around Kittredge Community Park with an experienced eye.

    Hannah has a family history of birding. Her great-grandmother is Louise Mounsey, who founded Evergreen Audubon with Sylvia Brockner, the longtime nature writer for the Canyon Courier.