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Outdoors

  • New ranger seeking solutions to issues in Evergreen parks

    As the newly hired park ranger for the Evergreen Park and Recreation District, Jason Garner says he plans to work with community residents to find solutions to issues that trouble them.

    “My goal is getting out there, making my presence known, so people have somebody to go to,” Garner said.

    By involving the community, problems in the parks can be reduced, he said.

    “Complaining, having issues, will only get you so far,” Garner said.

  • Remote slash-collection sites announced

    The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has announced its three remote slash drop-off dates for this summer. Jeffco again will team with mountain fire departments to host the sites.

    Slash disposal became more of a challenge when the Rooney Road Recycling Center stopped accepting organic material in 2012. Jefferson County has received a grant for an “air curtain” burner for slash, but a location hasn’t been decided yet.

  • Nest boxes for sale; bluebirds a happy arrival

    Once more Evergreen Audubon has made some bluebird and chickadee nest boxes for sale. The sale this year will be held on Saturday, March 8, beginning at 9 a.m. at the King Soopers in Bergen Park and in Conifer. If you need bird boxes, this is the time to buy them. They will be available until they are all sold, so get there early. If no one is there selling boxes, they are sold out.

  • Song sparrows find their voice as winter fades, spring nears

    February creeps to a close. It is to me the most dreary month of the year. The pleasantness of the Christmas and New Year’s holidays is over, and winter seems to really settle in, with both more snow and colder temperatures.

  • Meadows come alive with wildflower colors

    June is such an amazing month. Everything is making record growth and suddenly seems so full.

    The valleys that were bare all winter are now full of green willow leaves. Aspen are in full leaf; suddenly everything appears over-stuffed. It is a pleasure to see the spring green, which makes everything come alive.

  • Snowy owls seen more often in northern states this year

    This winter has brought unusually large incursions of snowy owls into the northern states. These big white beautiful owls nest on the arctic tundra, well above timberline, and regularly winter across southern Canada.

  • They are still red foxes no matter what color they are

    Probably the most common animal to be seen in this area is the red fox. When we first moved to Evergreen in 1965, there were only gray foxes to be seen, but it wasn’t long before a red fox moved in, and then gray foxes disappeared. For some time now, red foxes have dominated in the area to the point where I have not seen a gray fox for a long time.

  • Reeling them in, Evergreen style

    Sitting on the ice as a gusty breeze whipped across Evergreen Lake, Evan Gerbe was trying his luck at ice fishing for the first time.

    “It trips me out,” Gerbe said as he looked at the 2-foot rod he was dangling into a hole cut in the thick ice.

    Gerbe lives in Washington state, where he fishes for salmon with a 9-foot rod in a fast-flowing river. While visiting his mother in Evergreen, Gerbe said, he decided to participate in the second annual ice fishing derby on Saturday.

  • When ice melts, beavers will make an appearance at area lakes

    Today has been a gloomy winter day. No sun has shone through the cloud cover. The forest appears almost black, draped in ermine robes. We have about 6 inches of snow on the ground and more promised. It has been a depressing day, though the sun is supposed to shine tomorrow. It will be good to see blue sky and bright sunshine even though it will still be cold.

  • Yellow-bellied marmots cousins to famed groundhogs

    Editor’s note: The following column is reprinted from Jan. 2010. Sylvia Brockner’s column will return next week.

    Feb. 2 is Groundhog Day, a day that doesn’t have much significance here, but it does in the northeastern states, especially Pennsylvania, where it started.