.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Outdoors

  • The final fate of Frances the goose

    Several readers of this column have inquired recently if I knew what had become of “Frances” the Canada goose that lingered at Evergreen Lake into winter. Since I had suggested that the people who were concerned about Frances should call Carol Wade, I called her last week to find out what had transpired.

  • Winter cottonwoods and a new year of good birding

    The first day of winter certainly lived up to its name. It has been snowy and cold — very cold for so early in the season. The good news is that the winter solstice marks the shortest day of the year. From now on, each day grows a bit longer until the spring equinox brings equal days and nights, the official beginning of spring.

  • Christmas Bird Count a gift to Audubon

    Editor’s note: This week we’re reprinting Sylvia’s column from Dec. 14, 1972.

    Next Sunday, Dec. 17, the Evergreen Naturalists will hold their Christmas Bird Count. This annual project is sponsored by the National Audubon Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with bird clubs across the country participating.

  • Pine siskins fill the air with happy twittering

    Editor’s note: This week we’re reprinting Sylvia’s column from May 4, 1972.

    People frequently ask me how I became so interested in the outdoors. I was fortunate in having an amazing mother who encouraged all of us to follow our interests. She and I had an especially close rapport, since she had been a biology teacher.

  • Jeepers, brown creepers are here

    Many people have asked recently about a little brown mottled bird with a white breast and a curved beak that they have seen circling around the trunks of their trees. The bird is a brown creeper, a fairly common resident in our woodlands. Why they have become so obvious recently probably has several causes.

  • Clark’s nutcracker has things to crow about

    Editor’s note: This week we’re reprinting a column that Sylvia wrote in November 1972.

    The past few snowstorms resulted in my receiving several phone calls and queries from friends asking about the birds at their feeders.

  • Red crossbills are erratic wanderers

    On Wednesday, Nov. 5, our salubrious fall weather came to an abrupt end. Overnight, 12 to 15 inches of snow fell in the high mountains. We had only a skiff of snow here, and the day was bright and sunny, but a wicked wind out of the northwest brought our first really cold weather. Old King Boreas nearly blew us off the mountain.