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Outdoors

  • Everything’s coming up clover

    I have so many wonderful friends. I will never be able to thank them for all they do for me. Last week, two of them spent several hours on two different days helping me weed my garden. I don’t know how I can ever thank them.

    One thing that surprised me was that most of my weeds were clover or grass, probably a gift that came to me in some of the manure I have put on my garden in the past years.

  • ‘Yellow peril’ makes its June appearance

    Have you been miserable the past two weeks? If you are allergic to pine pollen, you probably have been most uncomfortable for this has been a very heavy pollen year.

    We have jokingly called it the “yellow peril.”

    The warm, dry weather produced an abundant crop of pollen, which blew around until we finally had two rainstorms in our area that washed most of it down to the ground where it seems to stay.

  • Area wildflowers are a hit now -- and even in 1871

    June has mostly been a beautiful month if you can overlook the troublesome hailstorm that shattered everyone’s

    garden last week.

    Hail is always likely in June. There is not much we can do about it. Sometimes a protective row cover will take the brunt of it and keep plants from being shredded so seriously, but I can’t recall a June that we haven’t had at least one destructive hailstorm. It is so regular that long ago I started calling June the hail month.

  • White pelicans make an appearance at Evergreen Lake

    There have been several reports of white pelicans this spring, most on the reservoirs east of Denver and even a small flock on Evergreen Lake for part of one morning.

    White pelicans are regular migrants through the area and nesting summer residents on the prairie reservoirs in eastern and northeastern Colorado. White pelicans can be seen in both spring and fall at Barr Lake and other reservoirs. They nest at Riverside Reservoir and on prairie lakes northward into the prairie provinces of Canada.

  • Get outside and help eradicate weeds at Evergreen Lake

    I don’t know where the month of May went, but it just disappeared with the spring snow.

    Now we are well into the month of June and the annual Community Weed Day is this coming Saturday, June 11.

    This is a very special day, open to the public and one of the few things that is still free. Community Weed Day is held on Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m. in the park on the Lake House lawn. It is co-sponsored by Evergreen Audubon, the local Mount Evans chapter of the Sierra Club, the Evergreen Garden Club, and the Evergreen Park and Recreation District.

  • Wrens arrive, making big noise and eating insects

    While out on the patio today, I was constantly serenaded by the boisterous song of a house wren.

    Later I noticed it was constantly busy carrying great mouthfuls of some stick-like material into a nest box. It is a strange nest box that a friend made some years ago and brought to me to try it out. It is supposed to attract swallows because the entrance hole is in the bottom of the box, but from the day I put it up, it has been used by house wrens every year.

  • Native flax have come into bloom

    It seems that we have had our one day of spring, and now it is summer. At least I have been working in the garden a bit, and it has been really warm. Fortunately, I didn’t trust the weather, so I didn’t put out the bedding plants I had purchased.

    Instead, I have been carrying them in and out every day so they haven’t gotten too pale and leggy or frozen, so I think tomorrow will be the day when they actually go into the garden.

  • Wet weather may bring new birds to Evergreen Lake

    The snow falls in big fat globs of collected flakes. Wet and sticky, it is collecting rapidly on trees, shrubs and what few perennial herbaceous plants have had the nerve to put forth new shoots already.

    It is May, and one would expect to see May flowers blooming, but alas, they are not. At least they are not blooming in any numbers. This is our seventh month of winter, and I am not happy to see more snow falling. However, such weather is expected in springtime Colorado where cold arctic air bumps into warm Gulf Coast air fairly regularly.

  • Spring beauties signal season’s awakening

    It is a lovely May morning. A half-inch of sugar snow covers the rapidly greening world like frosting on a cake. The sky is blue, the sun is out and the snow is already melting.

    Branches, twigs and leaves are dripping diamonds. It is a glorious sight to behold, refreshing to smell the damp earth and exhilarating to hear the spring medley of migrating birds at the feeder and the burbling music of Little Cub Creek in the valley below.

  • Looking forward to International Migratory Bird Day

    This coming Saturday, May 8, is International Migratory Bird Day, which will be celebrated locally at the Evergreen Nature Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    International Migratory Bird Day is a celebration of one of the most spectacular events in the world, the annual migration of birds. The day officially takes place on the second Saturday in May every year in most of the United States. However, it is celebrated at different times in different places due to the variation in migration.