.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Outdoors

  • Squirrels, catbirds are among autumn visitors

    There has been very little new at the feeder this week. This is because it is empty most of the time. The maintenance man here at Elk Run is very kind and he tries to keep it up and filled. However, some critter or critters seem to knock it down as fast as he can put it up. Since I hope to be going home in about 10 days, it is not worth the expense of an elaborate pulley system, so I must give up even though the birds bring me much joy.

  • Dark-eyed juncos bring color to fall bird feeders

    I am writing this on Sunday, Oct. 31. This has been a beautiful autumn Sunday with temperatures ranging from 60 this morning to the low 70s this afternoon.
    A light breeze is keeping it from being warmer, but the sky is at its best Colorado blue. I am still at Elk Run Assisted Living, disappointed that I need to stay a bit longer, but I now plan to be home with some of my family by Thanksgiving.

  • Mild fall brings out winged, four-legged creatures

    This has been a beautiful fall so far, with warm sunny days and blue skies.

    I am now getting physical therapy on my wrist and have enjoyed the warm, gold days as much as possible.

    I get outdoors for a bit most days to enjoy the fall weather while I can. Locally, some of the aspen are still green but other ones are in full color. From what I have seen on the TV news, many of the leaves have already been blown off in the high country.

  • Remember, raccoons are wild animals

    Well, I’ve done it again. Once a klutz, always a klutz. Seems like every few years, lately, I have to go tumbling around, either spraining or breaking something.

    This time it’s a broken right wrist. How these things happen so quickly amazes me, but of course, if you had time to think about it, they wouldn’t happen.

  • Take advantage of the changing seasons

    From Oct. 1, 2008

     

    It is a warm “summer” day, even if fall has arrived. While out on the patio enjoying the warm temperature, I noticed several patches of pine resin that were gathering the fallen scales of pine cones in their viscous, gooey puddles.

  • Beautiful fall presages winter’s chill

    Reprinted from Oct. 11, 2006

     

    This has been a beautiful fall, with the best color being at lower elevations, such as around Evergreen. The aspen in Little Cub Creek Valley have been at their best for a week now, but strong breezes have begun to take their toll.

    October has brought some of the warm weather we looked for in September, and we have enjoyed the Indian summer days.

  • A view from Sylvia’s window

    As most of my friends know, I took a tumble in early August and broke my right wrist, so I have been confined to a nursing home ever since I got out of the hospital. That’s only because I can’t manage very well by myself with only one arm. However, it’s doing well and I’ll soon be out of a cast and then I can do a great deal more, I hope, even though it will still be stiff and sore.

  • Elks’ bugling buffets fall landscape

    Originally published Sept. 7, 2006

     

    Once more it is time for the “bugling” of the bull elk to flow down the mountains. This eerie, wailing sound is part of the rutting season and as much a part of the Rocky Mountain autumn as the turning of the aspen leaves.

    The first call reported to me this year was on Saturday, Aug. 26. A bit early but not too unusual. The calling will continue through September and dwindle in October, with still a few last calls heard in November.

  • Crows are something to crow about

    When we moved here in 1965, crows were officially named the “common crow.” But, they were definitely not common in Evergreen, except in winter. Summer crows in the mountains were few and far between.

  • It's important to be bear-responsible

    Bears have been particularly plentiful this summer and will continue to be until about the first of November when snow and cold weather will send them into hibernation.

    We have had a female with three cubs roaming around Herzman’s Mesa most of the summer. This is a dangerous situation, and we need to do everything we can do to avoid human contact with these bears.