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Outdoors

  • Native flax have come into bloom

    It seems that we have had our one day of spring, and now it is summer. At least I have been working in the garden a bit, and it has been really warm. Fortunately, I didn’t trust the weather, so I didn’t put out the bedding plants I had purchased.

    Instead, I have been carrying them in and out every day so they haven’t gotten too pale and leggy or frozen, so I think tomorrow will be the day when they actually go into the garden.

  • Wet weather may bring new birds to Evergreen Lake

    The snow falls in big fat globs of collected flakes. Wet and sticky, it is collecting rapidly on trees, shrubs and what few perennial herbaceous plants have had the nerve to put forth new shoots already.

    It is May, and one would expect to see May flowers blooming, but alas, they are not. At least they are not blooming in any numbers. This is our seventh month of winter, and I am not happy to see more snow falling. However, such weather is expected in springtime Colorado where cold arctic air bumps into warm Gulf Coast air fairly regularly.

  • Spring beauties signal season’s awakening

    It is a lovely May morning. A half-inch of sugar snow covers the rapidly greening world like frosting on a cake. The sky is blue, the sun is out and the snow is already melting.

    Branches, twigs and leaves are dripping diamonds. It is a glorious sight to behold, refreshing to smell the damp earth and exhilarating to hear the spring medley of migrating birds at the feeder and the burbling music of Little Cub Creek in the valley below.

  • Looking forward to International Migratory Bird Day

    This coming Saturday, May 8, is International Migratory Bird Day, which will be celebrated locally at the Evergreen Nature Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    International Migratory Bird Day is a celebration of one of the most spectacular events in the world, the annual migration of birds. The day officially takes place on the second Saturday in May every year in most of the United States. However, it is celebrated at different times in different places due to the variation in migration.

  • Make boxes to stop birds from nesting in your homes

    Today has been a cold, damp, miserable day. After a week of unusually warm April weather, it was a blow to have a big low pressure area move in that brought together cold arctic air from the north and warm, wet Gulf Coast air from the south right over Colorado.

    This is typical of April in Colorado. If anything can be called typical of our spring weather, it is the pendulum swing, back and forth, from cold to hot without warning.

  • Robins have made their way back to Evergreen

    As I was coming home from a late trip to the library and grocery store, it was almost dark as I came up the hill when an American robin flew across the road right in front of me. I braked and he landed in a ponderosa pine in the yard, the same tree that a pair of robins has nested in for the past several years.

  • Cassin’s finches return to area after long hiatus

    Oh, how good it is to see green again. Today was a beautiful clear day. With a flow of warm air from the southwest, it was the first really warm day here in the mountains. Yesterday was clear and sunny, but the cold wind did not make it feel like spring.

  • There are black birds and then there are blackbirds

    All through late March, there have been reports of large flocks of blackbirds moving through the area: 150 in Kerr Gulch, 200 in Kittredge, 100 at Morrison, etc.

    We also have had more red-winged blackbirds at Evergreen Lake than there were this winter, so that means some migrants have arrived. The flock is much more talkative than it was, and males are displaying their red-shoulder epaulets, which indicate that some females have arrived and picked out nesting sites that must be defended.

  • Sandhill crane migration is a sight to behold

    Actually it was not bitter cold or the storm could have been much worse than it actually was. This is the week that I always call crane week for almost every year my husband Bill and I used to go to Nebraska at this time to see the sandhill crane migration.

    I had planned to go again this year and be a co-leader with Kathanne Lynch for an Evergreen Audubon trip, but apparently few Auduboners realized what a very special trip this is, and no one signed up to go. Or maybe they were just afraid of spring blizzards on the plains. My loss, I’m sorry to say.

  • Springtime brings a variety of returning birds

    It is just about dark on Thursday, March 18, and I have been standing out by the carport listening for the evening song of a robin.

    It has been a warm, hazy, partially cloudy spring-like day. Oddly enough, it has not dropped below freezing yet, but I expect it soon will. The weathermen on all the TV stations have been forecasting snow tonight. So, it looks like the first day of spring, March 20, will once more be snowy, which will probably be long gone by the time you receive this paper.