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Opinion

  • I have been a businessman in Evergreen since 1962. Evergreen Drug Company was an important institution in the history of Evergreen. During 2005 I became frustrated because of the burdensome managed-care regulations, third-party prescriptions and shrinking profit margins and chose to close Evergreen Drug. The same situation happened to most independently owned drugstores, and consequently chain stores have taken over the prescription business.

  • By Kelly Weist

    Leftists all agree that one of the first things the president-elect needs to “change” is the situation at Guantanamo Bay. At least, that’s what they thought prior to the election.

  • By Hannah B. Hayes:

  • If great communities have great schools, there can’t be a much better place to live than Evergreen. All schools in Evergreen received excellent ratings on school report cards issued by the Colorado Department of Education.

    It marks the fourth time in the last five years that all of our neighborhood schools achieved the highest rating. Our local charter, Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen, rated excellent in both its elementary and middle school programs.

  • Several years ago, I heard former governor Dick Lamm say that the biggest policy challenge of the 21st century would be sustainability. At the time, I thought he was speaking primarily about environmental issues, but recent events suggest the word encompasses even more than that.

    Of course, environmental sustainability remains a significant issue. As third-world countries catch up to industrialized nations, the problems connected with resource consumption and pollution will continue to grow.  

  • As the 1992 presidential campaign honed in on voter priorities, political consultant James Carville decided to simplify the message for his candidate. He told Bill Clinton, “It’s the economy, stupid.”

    When the 67th Colorado General Assembly convenes this week, Carville’s message will be coming through loud and clear. Everyone’s agenda is the same. It doesn’t matter whether it is the executive branch or the legislative branch. It doesn’t matter whether they are Republicans or Democrats. It’s the economy, stupid.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    A yard sign lives on in my neighborhood. It’s been up since 2001, proclaiming “United We Stand.” Passers-by can’t help but puzzle the sign’s meaning at the end of 2008. The owner’s pride exudes from the entire property, but the sign reeks of the prejudice of these last eight years.

  • Recently, the long-rumored demise of the Rocky Mountain News took another step toward reality. Announcing the paper is up for sale, the E.W. Scripps Co. signaled what may be the end an institution that has been part of Colorado for nearly 150 years.

    The news hit me harder than I expected. For all the other sources of information out there — and there are many — I just can’t imagine life without the Rocky. It’s been a part of my day since I learned to read.

  • Do you want to avoid one of the almost 46,000 malls or shopping centers in the United States during this holiday shopping season? Do you hate to circle endlessly to find a parking space at the mall? Do you despise wall-to-wall crowds and the opportunity for an ID thief to nab your personal information or steal your packages? You are not alone.

  • The things we, the people of Colorado, do to our state constitution are pretty remarkable. Most informed voters know and understand how the conflicting provisions of TABOR, which restricts government collections and expenditures; Amendment 23, which mandates increased spending for K-12 education regardless of the condition of the state treasury or impact on other state programs; and the Gallagher amendment, which creates ever disparate property tax treatment of residential and commercial property ties elected officials’ hands and makes it difficult to deliver government services.

  • Colorado is now a one-party state. The election of 2008 definitively put Democrats in the driver’s seat at both the state and federal levels.

    In addition to their control of the state House, state Senate and governor’s mansion, this year Democrats added wins in the U.S. Senate race (Mark Udall) and 4th Congressional District (Betsy Markey). Of Colorado’s nine seats in the U.S. House and Senate, only Congressman Doug Lamborn and Congressman-elect Mike Coffman have “R”s next to their names.

  • Hannah Hayes

    It’s Thanksgiving and an appropriate time to reflect on giving and receiving. A day, a season, perhaps an even longer time to trade in negative dialogue and give it up for someone who has contributed so much to our lives and to many others’ as well. This year I’ve chosen to write about Gloria Steinem. She appeared in our area a couple of times during the election cycle and I felt lucky to be able to hear this icon speak in person at the Lake House.

  • It’s been an interesting few years as it relates to general consensus about when to put school mill levy overrides and bond issues on ballots. Historically, lower voter turnout benefited these questions because teachers and parents were the more motivated voters. When those motivated supporters made up the largest possible percentage of the vote, the measures stood the best chances of winning.

  • Hannah Hayes

    This little piggy went to the free market; after all, we were told to shop. Unfortunately some shopped “on the margin,” meaning there was no inherent value in the paper they were purchasing. Who can blame the Chinese for trying to cash out if they started to feel insecure about the lack of backing on their loans?

  • Hannah Hayes

    Spending several nights in a Roy Rogers themed hotel room recently took me back to the childhood room my brother and I shared. Just think turquoise and brown. I loved all the ’50s Western TV shows, so, to further indulge nostalgia and my interest in politics, I watched a few episodes of “Maverick” when I got back home. Bret Maverick was an entirely different legend of the West than Roy was. Bret was always scheming, gambling and being run out of town. Roy Rogers knew it’s how you ride the trail that counts.

  • Writing before the election results are final, I have no idea of the outcome of the presidential race. So from behind a veil of ignorance, this column is an expression of support and good wishes to the newly elected president — whoever he is.

  • When witnesses testified about being in untenable situations before legislative committees on which Cliff Bryan served in the mid-’80s, the folksy appliance salesman-turned-state representative from Loveland often said, “It seems like we’ve put these people between the fire hydrant and the dog.”

  • Hannah Hayes

  • Immediately following the Democratic National Convention, a USA Today/Gallup poll showed Barack Obama leading John McCain by a comfortable 50-43 margin. USA Today/Gallup’s prior poll, released before the convention, showed Obama leading 48-45. The net difference of four points was the “bounce” provided by the convention.

  • When Jeffco school board President Scott Benefield told parents at the Aug. 21 meeting that “We all want a later start,” he set the stage for a real conversation about when school should start.