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Opinion

  • I’ve had my share of senior moments the last week, more of them unforgettable than forgetful.

    No single piece of mail can more brutally deliver mortality’s sharp stick in the eye than the dreaded AARP membership packet, and my own little reminder of the five-decade milestone came when seniors and their concerns were uppermost on my mind.

  • It’s ironic, isn’t it? Here we have access to more information than at any time in history, yet more than ever it seems we prefer to get our information from just the handful of sources reflecting only our own world views.

    My friends on the left visit websites like Daily Kos, Huffington Post and Talking Points Memo. They listen to 760 AM on the radio and watch MSNBC.

    On the conservative side, we read posts on Town Hall, Drudge Report and National Review Online. We listen to 710 AM and tune into Fox News in the evening.

  • In an effort to maximize efficient use of facilities and save money, the Jefferson County Board of Education has convened a 30-member community committee to review its facilities. Forty-five options to adjust how different buildings are used have been developed, and four community meetings are scheduled over the next week to solicit public input on possible changes.

  • I was on a flight back to Denver when the pilot came on the speaker with an announcement. 

    “For those of you following the ‘balloon boy’ story,” he said, “I’ve got great news — they found him in the garage, safe and sound.”

    There was some scattered applause and a little excited conversation. 

  • The bloom of term limits in Colorado seems to be off the rose.

  • Hannah Hayes

    When Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist who directed the Manhattan Project, witnessed the first atomic explosion, he quoted a line from the Bhagavad-Gita, “I am become Death, the shatterer of worlds.” The military smiled, and the rest of us started worrying.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    Evergreen Peace has the October display “Water Wars” at the Evergreen Public Library. Water issues have already caused numerous political and economic battles. Conflicts loom large as global-warming signals, such as melting polar ice caps, heightened hurricane activity and harsher drought and flood cycles, make water increasingly precious.

  • Emily’s List, an organization that was formed to support the election of pro-choice Democratic women, is named based upon what has become an increasingly true idiom of political campaigns. Emily stands for “Early money is like yeast.” Candidates’ ability to raise funds in the early stages of campaigns has something to do with how they will use that money in their campaigns, but has much more do to with how their campaigns are viewed by others.

  • While it took everyone by surprise — like a natural disaster — after my initial bewilderment, I decided to take stock of the Nobel Peace Prize being awarded to President Barack Obama. I am a legal immigrant to America, 10 years, silent lips, turning always the other cheek, giving always the second coat, observing always the laws of both my country of adoption and origin.

  • This month, Jefferson County residents will receive mail ballots for the “odd year” election. Among other questions, we will be asked whether to extend term limits for certain county officers and the district attorney, not the county commissioners.

    These will be presented as two separate ballot questions. In both cases, a “yes” vote would extend limits from two consecutive four-year terms to three consecutive four-year terms.

    I plan to vote “yes” on both.

  • By Hannah Hayes

  • My fellow community members:

  • The year 2010 is shaping up to be one of the most active primary seasons in recent Colorado history. In the U.S. Senate race, Democratic incumbent Sen. Michael Bennet (who was appointed by Gov. Bill Ritter when Ken Salazar became secretary of the interior) faces a spirited challenge from within his own party from Andrew Romanoff, former speaker of the state House.

  • Whenever Colorado’s budget is in distress, it seems that the biggest target is always on the back of higher education. The four biggest pots of general-fund moneys in the state budget are Medicaid, prisons, K-12 education and higher education. For practical, political and legal reasons, the first three are generally pretty protected. Higher education is often left to bear the biggest brunt of the reductions.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    Amy Goodman is a journalist to be admired. For more than 13 years, she’s been on TV and radio with “Democracy Now!” assisted by Daily News columnist Juan Gonzales. Amy is a tireless worker for independent media, and her energy and ability to inspire a crowd are awesome to watch. You can’t help but marvel at the incredible drive bundled in such a small package. She has fans and volunteers in tow wherever she goes.

  • One of my dad’s favorite stories about me is when he took me to the Big Top to buy a kite when I was 5. We found everything we needed for 97 cents. I handed my dollar to the store clerk and waited for change. When I asked for it, he told me it was for the governor. I said I didn’t want to buy a governor. After my dad and the clerk explained that the governor was going to use my 3 cents for the road to get to the store and the school I would soon attend, I acquiesced and let him keep the change I had anticipated.

  • As in physics, politics has a handful of immutable laws. One of these is the Law of Overreaching, which states that the party in power will inevitably overreach.

    Majority parties tend to act as though the entire population shares their core agenda. The problem with this, of course, is that for the most part no majority is possible without the support of a sizable number of voters who aren’t affiliated with either party.

  • We’re all familiar with the endless solicitations for credit cards in the mailbox, but the most desperate one I ever received was an actual check for $100. All I had to do was endorse it and I’d get the cash — along with a new credit card. No strings attached, right?

  • By Hannah Hayes

  • After the assassination of Sen. Robert Kennedy in 1968, his brother Ted ended a moving eulogy by saying, “My brother need not be idealized, or enlarged in death beyond what he was in life; to be remembered simply as a good and decent man, who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. Those of us who loved him and who take him to his rest today pray that what he was to us and what he wished for others will someday come to pass for all the world.”