• As journalists, the stories we tell are often referred to as the first draft of history. Others have said that we put the headlines on history as it happens.

    As an editor over the past 37 years, I have written somewhere around 150,000 headlines — a few clever, others disturbing, some so heartbreaking that they live still in my nightmares.

  • Library says thanks for additional funds


    As property tax notices begin to arrive, we want to say “Thanks!”

  • Anybody know where a guy can buy some crow meat? And while we’re at it, do any of you have a good crow recipe?

    I confidently wrote last year that while Donald Trump’s and Bernie Sanders’ campaigns for president were showing signs of success, they couldn’t last. I asserted that Trump’s success was nothing more than the result of the outrageousness of his comments, and that Sanders’ appeal had more to do with an enthusiasm gap for Hillary Clinton than for any real support for him.

  • If all politics is local, a phrase coined by former House speaker Tip O’Neill, then Colorado’s U.S. Senate race has come home to roost in the coverage areas of our three Jeffco newspapers.

    No less than three of the current 12 Republican candidates for the seat held by Democrat Michael Bennet hail from Jefferson County, and that trio’s political careers have been covered closely by our papers.

  • It may well be up to us.

    The odd constitutional provisions that will have the state of Colorado issuing refunds to taxpayers at the same time as cuts have to be made to a variety of government programs in 2016 have long been a source of consternation. Over the last year, a variety of things have been discussed.

  • Given the fact that a major theme of the coordinated campaign of all five members of the newly elected Jefferson County Board of Education was the lack of transparency their predecessors exhibited, it was more than a little disappointing when one of the first announced activities of the new board was to enter a secret session to discuss compliance with open-government requirements.

  • It’s a little known fact that members of Congress don’t have to live in the districts from which they are elected. That’s not the case for school board members in Colorado.

    There was some question about the residency of candidate Regan Benson during the recent school board election in Jefferson County, but as it didn’t appear (or occur) that she would be a particularly viable candidate, the issue went away pretty quietly.

  • By Greg Dobbs

    This is about more striped bicycle lanes on our roads, which our Jefferson County commissioners approved late last month, and it isn’t only important if you ride a bike. If you drive a car, it’s about you, too.

  • As we enter the holiday season, I’m thinking about a big do and a big don’t.

    The big do is Colorado Gives Day. In its five-year history, Colorado Gives has become the preferred way of making end-of-year charitable gifts for many people in our state. An initiative of the Community First Foundation and First Bank, Colorado Gives Day is an easy way to make contributions to more than 1,800 of our state’s nonprofit organizations.

  • The results in Tuesday’s school board recall were not surprising, but the vote margins were stunning: Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams were recalled with about 64 percent of the votes in a county where registrations are evenly split among Democrats, Republicans and independents.

  • Few things are more important to our four newspapers than coverage of high school sports, and few journalists could have brought that coverage to our readers more completely or competently than Michael Hicks. But after five years, Michael is leaving his post as sports editor at Evergreen Newspapers for his next challenge at the Boulder Daily Camera, and that paper is beyond lucky to have him.

  • I’ve been planning for weeks to offer my thoughts on the controversy surrounding the Jeffco school district. And I’ve also been procrastinating for weeks. Of late, our politically polarized school system has become the third rail of local politics — touch it, and you die.

    A phone call last week from a loyal reader stirred me from my inertia (some would say cowardice). The gentleman raised several good questions about our recent coverage and, as a result, helped me organize my own thoughts. He should call daily.

  • Imagine the impact of a Bernie Sanders-versus-Donald Trump presidential election in 2016. Property values in Canada would likely skyrocket with the biggest exodus of Americans to Canada since the end of the draft.

    Fourteen months before the next presidential election, the biggest surprise has been the emergence of Sanders and Trump when conventional wisdom suggests that neither has any chance, or business, of becoming president of the United States. Their seeming viability results from completely different circumstances in our two major political parties.

  • The worst thing about the almost two years of turmoil that we’ve experienced in Jefferson County schools is that it’s been a continuing distraction from the school district’s most important responsibility — to educate the kids who live in this county. Anything that distracts teachers from focusing their energy on giving kids the best possible education is a major flaw that should be resolved as soon as possible.

  • For our youths in the foothills, summer brings a freedom from school schedules for three brief months — you can read what you WANT to read. I was always excited about the first book of the summer — my choice. I love books. I love the feel of their weight, the smell and the look. To me, they represent a new beginning, hidden knowledge and the best of humanity. This may seem a bit romantic but … so be it — it’s summer!

  • The political news is surprising as two unlikely candidates are soaring in the polls. Not many would expect a self-identified socialist to challenge Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination for president, but U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders is gaining some traction. He trails her in a recent Iowa poll 52 percent to 33 percent. In New Hampshire, it’s 56 percent to 24 percent. No, he is not the front-runner, but his strong numbers are very surprising, and Clinton must be looking over her shoulder.

  • These life events just keep marching on. Our baby turns 21 next week.

    Since we moved to Evergreen almost 18 years ago, we’ve been through a lot of milestones. Two kids started school. Three kids completed elementary school, middle school and high school. Three kids had bat-mitzvahs. I turned 40 … and then 50 … and then more. (Luckily my wife is ageless and avoided these milestones.) We celebrated a silver wedding anniversary. Two kids graduated from college, one cum laude and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

  • Jefferson County students got a real-life lesson in civil disobedience last September when school board member Julie Williams suggested that a curriculum review committee be established that would, among other things, look into Advance Placement U.S. history classes with direction that “materials should not encourage or condone civil disorder, social strife or disregard of the law.”

  • Speeding on Brook Forest Road endangers residents, motorists


    I am 11 years old, and I have seen at least seven crashes on Brook Forest Road. I am sick and tired of people flying up the road and sounding as loud as a race car.

    Too many people have learned the hard way going too fast. A lot of the stories are dreadful, and I heard that one person even died. The others have had a lot of luck. I was shocked to see one live to see another day.