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Opinion

  • Several weeks ago a group of World War II veterans quietly gathered in Atlanta for what in all likelihood would be their final reunion. All in their 90s, they were the last remnant of a group of American volunteers that secretly traveled overseas in 1941 to fly combat missions against a brutal Japanese offensive in Asia. Their heroic exploits earned them the nickname “Flying Tigers.” To this day the Chinese speak of them in reverent tones, and few Flying Tigers were more revered than the spirited squadron leader known as Scarsdale Jack.

  • Thoughts on the election

    Editor:

    We are writing on Wednesday, Nov. 9. We are very happy. The candidate we supported for almost two years is now president-elect. We are part of the “common folk.” We knew people wanted a better economy, more opportunities, not more elitism, not more racism or gender bias.

  • In the wake of last week’s earth-shattering national election with implications that will likely take years to completely understand, Colorado’s reputation as one of the nation’s most purple states was reinforced.

  • Time for some facts regarding Platte Canyon school board recall

    Editor:

    I write this letter as an individual and 40-year resident of Park County.

  • Vote for Pete Weir, a DA with integrity, compassion

    Editor:

    It is both my privilege and honor to support Pete Weir for re-election as Jeffco’s district attorney. I first met Pete in the darkest days following Jessica Ridgeway’s kidnapping and homicide, and I witnessed first hand Pete’s leadership and compassion, as well as his unwavering resolve in the pursuit of justice for Jessica.

  • Why does Jeffco Public Schools need 3A and 3B?

    Editor:

    The short answer:

    Our kids need quality educational facilities and resources.

    The long answer:

  • A response to article on school district mill levy/bond

    Editor:

    A response to the Aug. 31 article by Sal Christ:

    The article mentions nothing of last year’s countywide property assessment increase of approximately 8 percent for 2014 and the anticipated increase of approximately 10 percent next year for 2016.

  • Do you even bend down to pick up a penny anymore when you spot one on the street?

    I do, because my father taught me that if I don’t, it means I no longer appreciate the value of money. After all these years, although the buying power of a penny has been devalued to almost nothing, the lesson hasn’t.

    But many of you probably don’t pick up that paltry penny anymore, and I don’t blame you. Although it never bought much, it used to buy something. Now, it’s hard to think of anything you get for a single brass penny.

  • In all presidential elections, there are voters who have unfavorable opinions of both candidates. In 1996 it was 7 percent; then 5 percent in 2000, 6 percent in 2004, and 5 percent in 2012. This time the number is 35 percent. Wow, that’s over a third of voters who are not impressed with either candidate. In fact, I predict that a record number of Americans will vote for someone other than the candidates nominated by the two parties. So the big question is, how did we nominate two candidates we don’t like and who aren’t likely to get our vote?

  • Upon resigning from the Friar’s Club, Groucho Marx famously said, “I don’t want to belong to any club that would have me as a member.” That reasoning seems to be consistent with two ballot measures before us this fall concerning primary elections.

  • In addition to electing a president, U.S. senator, members of Congress, the state legislature and county commissioners, it looks like we’re headed for another very busy ballot when we vote this November.

  • Visiting musician praises Jazz Festival

    Editor:

    My name is Kris Tokarski; I am a jazz pianist based out of New Orleans who recently had the pleasure of performing at the Evergreen Jazz Festival with my trio. I wanted to relay a few words about my experience in an effort to spread the word about this annual weekend-long event.

  • It was the last train out of Paris during a summer of discontent. The Euro 2016 soccer championship — a temporary distraction from the impending Brexit vote — made the French capital the focal point of Europe as rail workers, taxi drivers, sanitation staff, air-traffic controllers and petrol workers took full advantage by declaring near-simultaneous labor strikes. The River Seine, in an apparent protest of her own, overflowed along the Quai d’Orsay as if attempting to wash away the gathering gloom.

  • I hope you enjoyed the Fourth of July. I guess I’m really getting old, because although the music at Buchanan Park was good, I missed the National Repertory Orchestra playing patriotic music. I did get my John Philip Sousa fix later watching the celebrations from Washington and Boston. If you are like I am, you still get a strong feeling of patriotism and pride in our nation on special days like Memorial Day and the Fourth of July.

  • The other day I was riding my bike on the road up Squaw Pass. On a straight stretch where I could see about a quarter mile in both directions, a big truck was barreling toward me from up ahead — a cement-mixer, which is one wide dude! When I checked my handlebar mirror, a car was fast approaching from behind, too.

    It looked like these two vehicles might meet right where I was tooling along on my bike. No problem — not if the truck driver stays in his own lane, I shift over to the narrow shoulder, and the driver coming from behind has any sense. 

  • Memorial Day is not celebrated by all nations; it is a U.S. holiday. It’s a day of remembrance (lest we forget) to honor those Americans who made the ultimate sacrifice protecting the freedoms we all too often take for granted.

    In Cambridge, England, however, not only is Memorial Day recognized, it is the most important day of the year at the American Cemetery and Memorial 3 miles outside the city center. This year, I had the privilege of attending their ceremony, surrounded by 8,939 names engraved in this garden of stone.

  • We should cherish Evergreen’s natural beauty

    Editor:

  • The 17th session of the Colorado General Assembly adjourned last week after a session that was long on partisan wrangling and relatively short on meaningful public policy achievements. As could have been expected in an election-year session when Democrats controlled the House by a 34-31 margin and Republicans had an 18-17 edge in the Senate, most bills that pursued a partisan agenda did not pass.

  • Make your voice heard in EPRD election

    Editor: