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Opinion

  • In what was arguably the best election night for Republicans since 1994, Colorado’s reputation as a very purple state has remained intact.

    Republicans made huge gains across the country. They picked up at least seven seats, including Colorado’s, in the U.S. Senate to take control of that body. They increased their majority in the U.S. House by at least 10 seats. They won several governor races, and Republican governors will now be in place in 31 states. They achieved significant gains in state legislatures around the country.

  • Six former HD25 legislators endorse Keyser

    Editor:

    As residents of House District 25 and as current and former members of the Colorado House of Representatives and Colorado Senate, we are writing to add our voices to the growing number of people in our community who are proudly supporting Jon Keyser for Colorado state representative.

  • Early in the afternoon of the first Monday in October (the day the Supreme Court convenes each year for its new term), I got an e-mail from House Speaker Mark Ferrandino titled “Love Wins.” It announced that the Supreme Court had declined to hear any of the marriage equality cases from various courts of appeals and that Attorney General John Suthers had announced he would take steps to clear the way for gay marriage in Colorado.

  • Out of life¹s worst moments can come life¹s best lessons.

    I’ve seen that at every natural disaster I’ve ever covered, where someone who just lost virtually every personal possession short of the shirt off his back still can manage to voice some variation of, “At least my family is safe, and that’s really all that matters.”

    Well, I just saw that spirit in spades at the restaurant across from Evergreen Lake called Willow Creek. The couple who own it, Kristopher and Curtis Lincoln, lost their daughter more than a decade ago.

  • “The history of liberty is the history of resistance.”

    — Woodrow Wilson

    I have remained stubbornly silent about the new school board majority for many months, mainly because I felt the three new members deserved a chance to prove that the hysteria about hidden agendas was an overreaction.

  • And then there were four.

    While a lot of attention was focused on Gov. John Hickenlooper’s work to successfully negotiate an agreement to spare us from four competing ballot initiatives on fracking, four other ballot initiatives have made their way onto our November ballot.

    The topics range from personhood to gambling to open meetings to food labeling. In a somewhat refreshing twist, two of the four proposals are initiated laws instead of amendments to our state constitution.

  • Ride’s male-female ratio shows need to get more women involved

    Editor:

    My legs are sore, my mind is clear and my heart is happy. … I again finished the Triple Bypass, riding through 120 miles of our beautiful Colorado mountains!

  • Editor’s note: This column is the fourth installment in a five-part series that looks at the divisiveness in the U.S. Congress and offers possible solutions.

    The conventional wisdom, especially among Republicans, is that the news operations at the major networks favor the Democrats. It’s subtle, they say, but the stories they cover and the questions they ask show their left leaning. You might remember that Katie Couric ambushed Sarah Palin asking a trick question: “What publications do your read?”

  • Thanks for memorial bench

    Editor:

    A beautiful memorial bench in honor of Laurie Roe now sits in downtown Evergreen right outside Bear Creek Hair. Thanks to all those who generously donated money and time to make this a reality.

    Special thanks to the Ross Lewis Trust, Jake and Mary Jacobs, Terri and Gary Carroll, and Don and Michelle Beaglehole. The remaining funds from the memorial account will be donated to the Elks Lodge. We hope everyone will stop by, sit on the bench and enjoy the beautiful garden.

  • When metro area voters were being asked to extend the sales tax that had been established to build Coors Field in 1998 so a new football stadium could be built to replace aging Mile High Stadium for the Broncos, the polling showed something fascinating. One of the biggest obstacles to passage of the proposal was voters’ personal animosity toward Broncos owner Pat Bowlen.

  • Thanks to the deputies who apprehended carjacking suspect

    Editor:

    I just want to say thank you to the Jefferson County sheriff’s deputies who apprehended and subdued a heavily armed carjacking suspect last week on Interstate 70.

    As the video shows, deputies risked their own safety for the sake of their fellow citizens. I’m sure you guys would say you were just doing your jobs, but that doesn’t make this community any less grateful. Thank you again.

    Rob Witwer, Genesee

  • Editor’s note: This column is the third installment in a four-part series looking at the divisiveness in the U.S. Congress and offering possible solutions.

    I ask you to imagine that you are thinking about running to become a legislator, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Perhaps you have had a successful career, and you want to “give back” by serving your home district and your country. It’s a “Mr. Smith goes to Washington” thought you are having.

  • By Dean Dalvit

    It was disheartening to see George Long’s seemingly accusatory letter in last week’s Courier. I was surprised that Mr. Long was unable to find any information about the Downtown Evergreen Economic District and its voluntary 1 percent fund-raising program, the Evergreen Legacy Fund, before writing his letter. However, he poses excellent questions, and we are happy to respond. It’s always good to remind the community about what we’re doing and how we’re doing it. So, to answer each of Mr. Long’s questions:

  • When I was a junior at Steamboat Springs High School in 1975, there was a huge controversy when the Boulder County clerk began issuing same-sex marriage licenses. It was a national story, but it was really big news in Steamboat, as the clerk had grown up there and her father was the longtime clerk in our county.

  • Editor’s note: This column is the second installment in a four-part series that will look at the divisiveness in the U.S. Congress and offer possible solutions.

    By Jim Rohrer

    Have you ever participated in any type of athletic contest in which you feel that the deck is stacked against you or your team? Maybe your opponent’s advantage is technically within the rules, but something about the advantage seems unfair. Someone pushed the rules to the limit.

  • Leading up to the Republican gubernatorial primary June 24, the Colorado Springs Gazette ran an editorial May 19 urging candidates Mike Kopp and Scott Gessler to drop out of the race to ensure that Bob Beauprez would win the nomination over Tom Tancredo. The Gazette argued that Tancredo was not a viable candidate in the general election and that Gov. John Hickenlooper’s re-election would be a sure thing if Tancredo became the Republican nominee.

  • As long as I’ve lived in Evergreen, and that’s 28 years now, there has been an upside and a downside to being unincorporated. The upside is simple to see: We don’t have an additional layer of government, nor do we bear the costs of one. There are so many generous, committed, civic-minded citizens and nonprofits here that we don’t usually need a mayor or a council.

  • Maybe they just got tired of being called the new conservative majority.

    How else can you explain school board members Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams voting to pay, including performance incentives, new superintendent Daniel McMinimee almost 40 percent more than his predecessor and to give him a five-year contract despite the fact that he’s never been a superintendent before? The decision doesn’t meet any definition of conservative I’ve ever heard.

  • Board majority disregarding community

    Editor:

    Parents and citizens of Jefferson County ought to feel outraged at the recent actions of the new majority members of the school board. Let’s see. What’s happened so far this year?

    • A decision to provide all-day, paid kindergarten at Lasley Elementary in Jeffco is on the chopping block, something parents and community members of this county had already voted on and approved.