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Opinion

  • The other day I was riding my bike on the road up Squaw Pass. On a straight stretch where I could see about a quarter mile in both directions, a big truck was barreling toward me from up ahead — a cement-mixer, which is one wide dude! When I checked my handlebar mirror, a car was fast approaching from behind, too.

    It looked like these two vehicles might meet right where I was tooling along on my bike. No problem — not if the truck driver stays in his own lane, I shift over to the narrow shoulder, and the driver coming from behind has any sense. 

  • Memorial Day is not celebrated by all nations; it is a U.S. holiday. It’s a day of remembrance (lest we forget) to honor those Americans who made the ultimate sacrifice protecting the freedoms we all too often take for granted.

    In Cambridge, England, however, not only is Memorial Day recognized, it is the most important day of the year at the American Cemetery and Memorial 3 miles outside the city center. This year, I had the privilege of attending their ceremony, surrounded by 8,939 names engraved in this garden of stone.

  • We should cherish Evergreen’s natural beauty

    Editor:

  • The 17th session of the Colorado General Assembly adjourned last week after a session that was long on partisan wrangling and relatively short on meaningful public policy achievements. As could have been expected in an election-year session when Democrats controlled the House by a 34-31 margin and Republicans had an 18-17 edge in the Senate, most bills that pursued a partisan agenda did not pass.

  • Make your voice heard in EPRD election

    Editor:

  • A half century ago in rural Pennsylvania, a woman named Clem spent her mornings immersed in the pungent smell of chlorine and the ornery noise of youngsters wakened too early.

    Part drill instructor and part den mother, Clem preached water safety with the fervor of a country minister, and over the years she taught thousands of young charges how to swim. For the older students, the ones earning their lifeguard certification, this also meant a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  • In the 1980s, futurist John Naisbitt coined the term “high tech/high touch.”

    “The more technology we introduce into society,” he wrote, “the more people will aggregate, will want to be with other people.”

    While some predicted technologies such as home entertainment would mark the end of the movie theater, Naisbitt astutely observed that people don’t go to theaters to see movies per se; we go there to see movies with other people.

  • By John Newkirk

    As a boy I used to pass time on the school bus by counting street signs bearing names of classmates or family friends: Norman Lane. Willa Way. Lemasters Drive. Julie Lane. Granzella Road. Herzman Drive. What a novelty, I thought, to live in a community where roads are named after residents who are still living.

  • Shelves seem emptier at Evergreen Library

    Editor:

    I just came back from the Evergreen Library, where I picked up two books I had requested. I find that I have to request books more often, as the library shelves are becoming more empty as days go by.

  • As journalists, the stories we tell are often referred to as the first draft of history. Others have said that we put the headlines on history as it happens.

    As an editor over the past 37 years, I have written somewhere around 150,000 headlines — a few clever, others disturbing, some so heartbreaking that they live still in my nightmares.

  • Library says thanks for additional funds

    Editor:

    As property tax notices begin to arrive, we want to say “Thanks!”

  • Anybody know where a guy can buy some crow meat? And while we’re at it, do any of you have a good crow recipe?

    I confidently wrote last year that while Donald Trump’s and Bernie Sanders’ campaigns for president were showing signs of success, they couldn’t last. I asserted that Trump’s success was nothing more than the result of the outrageousness of his comments, and that Sanders’ appeal had more to do with an enthusiasm gap for Hillary Clinton than for any real support for him.

  • If all politics is local, a phrase coined by former House speaker Tip O’Neill, then Colorado’s U.S. Senate race has come home to roost in the coverage areas of our three Jeffco newspapers.

    No less than three of the current 12 Republican candidates for the seat held by Democrat Michael Bennet hail from Jefferson County, and that trio’s political careers have been covered closely by our papers.

  • It may well be up to us.

    The odd constitutional provisions that will have the state of Colorado issuing refunds to taxpayers at the same time as cuts have to be made to a variety of government programs in 2016 have long been a source of consternation. Over the last year, a variety of things have been discussed.

  • Given the fact that a major theme of the coordinated campaign of all five members of the newly elected Jefferson County Board of Education was the lack of transparency their predecessors exhibited, it was more than a little disappointing when one of the first announced activities of the new board was to enter a secret session to discuss compliance with open-government requirements.

  • It’s a little known fact that members of Congress don’t have to live in the districts from which they are elected. That’s not the case for school board members in Colorado.

    There was some question about the residency of candidate Regan Benson during the recent school board election in Jefferson County, but as it didn’t appear (or occur) that she would be a particularly viable candidate, the issue went away pretty quietly.

  • By Greg Dobbs

    This is about more striped bicycle lanes on our roads, which our Jefferson County commissioners approved late last month, and it isn’t only important if you ride a bike. If you drive a car, it’s about you, too.

  • As we enter the holiday season, I’m thinking about a big do and a big don’t.

    The big do is Colorado Gives Day. In its five-year history, Colorado Gives has become the preferred way of making end-of-year charitable gifts for many people in our state. An initiative of the Community First Foundation and First Bank, Colorado Gives Day is an easy way to make contributions to more than 1,800 of our state’s nonprofit organizations.

  • The results in Tuesday’s school board recall were not surprising, but the vote margins were stunning: Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams were recalled with about 64 percent of the votes in a county where registrations are evenly split among Democrats, Republicans and independents.

  • Few things are more important to our four newspapers than coverage of high school sports, and few journalists could have brought that coverage to our readers more completely or competently than Michael Hicks. But after five years, Michael is leaving his post as sports editor at Evergreen Newspapers for his next challenge at the Boulder Daily Camera, and that paper is beyond lucky to have him.