• Why does Jeffco Public Schools need 3A and 3B?


    The short answer:

    Our kids need quality educational facilities and resources.

    The long answer:

  • A response to article on school district mill levy/bond


    A response to the Aug. 31 article by Sal Christ:

    The article mentions nothing of last year’s countywide property assessment increase of approximately 8 percent for 2014 and the anticipated increase of approximately 10 percent next year for 2016.

  • Do you even bend down to pick up a penny anymore when you spot one on the street?

    I do, because my father taught me that if I don’t, it means I no longer appreciate the value of money. After all these years, although the buying power of a penny has been devalued to almost nothing, the lesson hasn’t.

    But many of you probably don’t pick up that paltry penny anymore, and I don’t blame you. Although it never bought much, it used to buy something. Now, it’s hard to think of anything you get for a single brass penny.

  • In all presidential elections, there are voters who have unfavorable opinions of both candidates. In 1996 it was 7 percent; then 5 percent in 2000, 6 percent in 2004, and 5 percent in 2012. This time the number is 35 percent. Wow, that’s over a third of voters who are not impressed with either candidate. In fact, I predict that a record number of Americans will vote for someone other than the candidates nominated by the two parties. So the big question is, how did we nominate two candidates we don’t like and who aren’t likely to get our vote?

  • Upon resigning from the Friar’s Club, Groucho Marx famously said, “I don’t want to belong to any club that would have me as a member.” That reasoning seems to be consistent with two ballot measures before us this fall concerning primary elections.

  • In addition to electing a president, U.S. senator, members of Congress, the state legislature and county commissioners, it looks like we’re headed for another very busy ballot when we vote this November.

  • Visiting musician praises Jazz Festival


    My name is Kris Tokarski; I am a jazz pianist based out of New Orleans who recently had the pleasure of performing at the Evergreen Jazz Festival with my trio. I wanted to relay a few words about my experience in an effort to spread the word about this annual weekend-long event.

  • It was the last train out of Paris during a summer of discontent. The Euro 2016 soccer championship — a temporary distraction from the impending Brexit vote — made the French capital the focal point of Europe as rail workers, taxi drivers, sanitation staff, air-traffic controllers and petrol workers took full advantage by declaring near-simultaneous labor strikes. The River Seine, in an apparent protest of her own, overflowed along the Quai d’Orsay as if attempting to wash away the gathering gloom.

  • I hope you enjoyed the Fourth of July. I guess I’m really getting old, because although the music at Buchanan Park was good, I missed the National Repertory Orchestra playing patriotic music. I did get my John Philip Sousa fix later watching the celebrations from Washington and Boston. If you are like I am, you still get a strong feeling of patriotism and pride in our nation on special days like Memorial Day and the Fourth of July.

  • The other day I was riding my bike on the road up Squaw Pass. On a straight stretch where I could see about a quarter mile in both directions, a big truck was barreling toward me from up ahead — a cement-mixer, which is one wide dude! When I checked my handlebar mirror, a car was fast approaching from behind, too.

    It looked like these two vehicles might meet right where I was tooling along on my bike. No problem — not if the truck driver stays in his own lane, I shift over to the narrow shoulder, and the driver coming from behind has any sense. 

  • Memorial Day is not celebrated by all nations; it is a U.S. holiday. It’s a day of remembrance (lest we forget) to honor those Americans who made the ultimate sacrifice protecting the freedoms we all too often take for granted.

    In Cambridge, England, however, not only is Memorial Day recognized, it is the most important day of the year at the American Cemetery and Memorial 3 miles outside the city center. This year, I had the privilege of attending their ceremony, surrounded by 8,939 names engraved in this garden of stone.

  • We should cherish Evergreen’s natural beauty


  • The 17th session of the Colorado General Assembly adjourned last week after a session that was long on partisan wrangling and relatively short on meaningful public policy achievements. As could have been expected in an election-year session when Democrats controlled the House by a 34-31 margin and Republicans had an 18-17 edge in the Senate, most bills that pursued a partisan agenda did not pass.

  • Make your voice heard in EPRD election


  • A half century ago in rural Pennsylvania, a woman named Clem spent her mornings immersed in the pungent smell of chlorine and the ornery noise of youngsters wakened too early.

    Part drill instructor and part den mother, Clem preached water safety with the fervor of a country minister, and over the years she taught thousands of young charges how to swim. For the older students, the ones earning their lifeguard certification, this also meant a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  • In the 1980s, futurist John Naisbitt coined the term “high tech/high touch.”

    “The more technology we introduce into society,” he wrote, “the more people will aggregate, will want to be with other people.”

    While some predicted technologies such as home entertainment would mark the end of the movie theater, Naisbitt astutely observed that people don’t go to theaters to see movies per se; we go there to see movies with other people.

  • By John Newkirk

    As a boy I used to pass time on the school bus by counting street signs bearing names of classmates or family friends: Norman Lane. Willa Way. Lemasters Drive. Julie Lane. Granzella Road. Herzman Drive. What a novelty, I thought, to live in a community where roads are named after residents who are still living.

  • Shelves seem emptier at Evergreen Library


    I just came back from the Evergreen Library, where I picked up two books I had requested. I find that I have to request books more often, as the library shelves are becoming more empty as days go by.

  • As journalists, the stories we tell are often referred to as the first draft of history. Others have said that we put the headlines on history as it happens.

    As an editor over the past 37 years, I have written somewhere around 150,000 headlines — a few clever, others disturbing, some so heartbreaking that they live still in my nightmares.