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Features

  • The Sheriff’s Mounted Posse of Jefferson County began in February 1952, when the initial 30 deputies were sworn in by Sheriff Carl Enlow. Enlow, a Republican who served as county sheriff from 1949 to 1957, considered the creation of the posse, along with radio communication and marked patrol cars, as his major contributions to the department.

  •  Veterans in their 80s and 90s who were members of the 10th Mountain Division at its inception came to the Evergreen Lake House on June 8 to tell stories of the amazing winter warriors who changed the world and then came home to create Colorado’s ski industry.

    A full house of 250 attended the event, "A Tribute to the 10th Mountain Division." Presentations included a slide show of vintage photographs and a Tom Brokaw video, as well as a collection of memorabilia.

  • Carved into the gentle slope of “Summit Flats” is a canyon ringed with cliffs, which is home to the small but noisy Tumbling Creek. Into the updraft, out of this alpine valley, is my choice for a good measure of my cremains to be released to the winds. While, as a first-grader, I had started to explore this waterfall of a creek, instead of fishing, it was along this cliff edge that my Forest Service trails crew, in 1962, was directed to restore the original Mount Evans Trail that connected the Shelter Meadow Cabin with the Stone Shelter at Summit Lake.

  • As with most people living with a view of the Front Range mountains, I never tire of waking to view our local peaks wearing a cap of fresh snow — even though, this time of year, the storms come and go with a magical quickness. Like most of the kids I grew up with, I enjoyed hiking, camping, riding and fishing in the forests surrounding Mount Evans and its adjoining neighbors, with all of us feeling like these lands were part of our backyard.

  • Members of the arts and business communities of Evergreen are joining forces to produce a multi-week showcase of visual, musical, theatrical and cultural delights, "Arts Alive Evergreen," from July 15-31.

    This year there will be more art on display at the Bergen Village Shopping Center, more children's theater, new jazz workshops for teens, a free outdoor silent movie, an extra week and an extra weekend, in addition to the Summerfest and Jazz Festival weekends.

  • It’s not exactly a trip to Tahiti, but divers venturing into the various underground reservoirs serving the Evergreen Metro District help keep the water system in good shape.

  •  At EDS Waste Solutions, recyclables are getting a makeover. They come in looking like a disorganized mess and go out in style.

    EDS has installed an elevated sorting station with a conveyor belt, an industrial compactor and a baling machine at the EDS transfer station and recycling center at 5801 Highway 73.

  • “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”
    — Herodotus

    A couple of weeks ago, longtime Evergreen resident Mary Noyes found a curious letter in her mailbox.

  • Jock Spence constructed the bell tower at the Mission of the Transfiguration in 1911. Then, the Army Corps of Engineers restored it in 1978. The 35-foot tower, besides calling families to service, has greeted travelers as they entered Evergreen after driving Highway 74, climbing through Bear Creek Canyon. Many citizens of Evergreen still consider the bell tower one of the gateways of town.

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    The bell tower that stands sentry over the east end of downtown Evergreen is in need of repair, and the Church of the Transfiguration is hoping to get a grant to do the restoration work.

    The tower, originally dedicated on Easter Sunday 1911, was rededicated by the church’s congregation on April 24 to mark its 100th anniversary.

  • An Evergreen woman has started a new business to help people overwhelmed by clutter and mess, or even struggling with just one room full of disorganization.

    Think of that home office that seems perpetually buried in books, papers, boxes and bills. Shows like "Hoarders" on cable's A&E channel have exposed the emotional toll of compulsive collecting.

  • A secluded tree house with all the amenities of a luxury hotel room, including a champagne-bubble hot tub for two, is innkeeper Gail Riley's idea of the picture-perfect romantic getaway.

    After two years of planning and construction and endless hours of shopping, research and thought, the Tree House at Highland Haven Creekside Inn is a reality. As of April 1, a few finishing touches were being added, but the multitude of details finally were complete and reservations were being booked.

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    A young family from Evergreen with a knack for showmanship has won the grand prize over 185 other entries in a national video dance contest sponsored by the Primrose Schools of Atlanta.

    Thanks to the efforts of Rebekah and Schannon Gumz and their son, Aiden, 4, a $30,000 donation will go to Children's Hospital from the Primrose Schools based in Atlanta.

    They also received a $5,000 cash prize, which the family is donating back to Primrose School of Bear Creek in Lakewood, where Aiden goes to day care.

  • Along the north boundary of Mountain Park Homes, a lone chimney still stands below the granite cliffs. It is a fireplace that, for many, marks some of the mystery that was born to a subdivision whose small lots were designed for tents and one-room cabins.

  • Editor’s note: Local paleoclimatologist Peter Link filed this report on a recent trip to Patagonia. His photographs accompany the article.

    By Peter Link

    For the Courier

  • Some people used the words “relocation center” to describe Camp Amache in southeast Colorado, but Kittredge resident Robert Fuchigami calls it what it was to him: a concentration camp.

    Today, his memories of the World War II internment center no longer hold Fuchigami captive; he’s made peace with what happened during the war, when thousands of Japanese-Americans were imprisoned by hatred and suspicion. Today, he’s fascinated with the camp’s history, not bound by his memories of the three years his family spent there.

  • Faye Hess may be almost 93 years old, but she can compete with people half her age when it comes to sewing and making quilts.

    Hess recently completed an enormous quilting project that she is donating to Mt. Evans Hospice, which is holding a raffle to raise money for the hospice.

    Tickets are $10 each or three for $25 and can be purchased online at www.mtevans.org or in person from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3081 Bergen Peak Drive. A drawing will be held on the Fourth of July at the party for the Freedom Run, a benefit for Mt. Evans Hospice.

  • Ten years ago, when Pastor Vera Guebert-Steward was looking for her first job as a minister, she heard about an opening at Evergreen Lutheran Church.

    She had a strong feeling that the church near Marshdale would be the right place for her. When she saw the little buildings and interviewed for the job, she was even more certain. When they offered her the job, it took about 30 seconds to decide.

  • Editor's note: As our country fights its way out of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Clear Creek Courant is remembering those who fought for their very survival through the days following Black Tuesday into the winds of the Dust Bowl and onto the beaches of the Second World War.

    Longtime Empire resident Duane Lewis was 8 when he was given a trumpet and began learning to play music.
    He was 15 years old in 1929 when the stock market crashed, pitching the United States into the dark years of the Great Depression.

  • In addition to maintaining trails in the Clear Creek District of the Arapaho National Forest in the Upper Bear Creek Basin, I enjoyed working on the trails up Grays and Torreys Peaks.