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Features

  • If there’s anything to be said about Randy and Sharon Massey, it’s that they’re dedicated to everyone — whether on two legs or four.

    The Soda Creek couple are passionate about taking care of their customers at L&H Auto Body, and just as passionate — or even more so — about taking care of dogs. Sharon is the president of Retriever Rescue of Colorado, and the two have intertwined their callings to take care of auto repair customers and rescued retrievers.

  • Ever since he was 8 years old and tried to stretch the skin of a squirrel on a board, Brad Haddix has been attracted to the ancient art of taxidermy.

  • A Colorado governor whose courageous support of civil rights during World War II is now honored with a tall, rose-colored monument on Kenosha Pass.
    Some 264 miles of U.S. 285 was officially renamed the Ralph Carr Memorial Highway on Sunday in honor of the former governor, who opposed the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

  • For a decade in the middle of Winston Jones’ long run exhibiting the world’s largest bell collection, in and around his lovely home at the start of Upper Bear Creek, Orville Hagen gave Bergen Park the right to claim the title of the world’s largest collection of clocks. If you missed visiting the Clock Museum before its closure, you missed the chance to hear more than 1,000 clocks chiming at once. If you missed Winston ringing in the new year before his passing and leaving his collection to Hasting College, you missed a huge and unique opportunity.

  • By Virginia Grantier

    She knows about challenges: Brenn Lea Pearson, 64, who lives alone with her two dogs, is a longtime graphic designer in Evergreen who has been trying to regroup in this economy since her New York and San Francisco book publishing jobs went overseas and local work became scarce.

    They know about challenges: This group that waits in their chairs and wheelchairs on Wednesdays for Pearson. They have a range of issues: Some have Alzheimer’s; others are recovering from strokes or other debilitating physical conditions.

  • The Bagelry
        1242 Bergen Parkway
        Evergreen, CO 80439
        303-674-1413
        Click Here for Directions
        Click Here to see our Menu
    Brook Forest Inn
        8136 S. Brook Forest Rd

  • “… The Hussars let loose their horses. God, what power! They ran through the smoke and the sound was like a thousand blacksmiths beating with a thousand hammers.”
    — Henry Sienkievich, describing
    a 17th-century battle between
    Polish Hussars and invading Swedish forces

  • The kids called him Mr. Awesome Cool Man — a telling title for Todd Brodeur, a world champion Frisbee player who taught students at Bergen Meadow and Bergen Valley elementary schools the art of Frisbee.

    Playing with a Frisbee is a wonderful sport, Brodeur told students at an assembly at Bergen Meadow recently. Brodeur spent four days at the school as part of the schools’ artist-in-residence program.

    “You can stay active,” he said. “You can keep your heart beating and lungs breathing.”

  • While on hiatus from a career as a commercial real estate developer, Bill Valaika of Evergreen is using the down time to embellish guitars that are being auctioned off for worthy causes.
    Using a secret-formula glue and thousands of Swarovski crystals, Valaika turns a plain guitar face into a colorful, flaming logo light show.
    “It’s unbelievable to see on stage, Valaika said. “The crowd loves it.”
    Each guitar takes 40 hours to produce and is worth about $2,000 in materials.

  • By Burdette “Bud” Weare
    A hundred years ago, Colorado’s elk herd appeared to be following the fate of the bison. Locally, the Evergreen Elks outnumbered the Evergreen elk. And thereby hangs a tale.

  • Editor’s note: Local paleoclimatologist Peter Link embarked on a trip to South America earlier this year with his trusty camera in hand. His account of the trip follows, accompanied by stunning photos.

    By Peter Link
    1It was January, the dead of winter — time to break for South America.
    And so, Scott from Shreveport, my brother Andy from Houston and I boarded an overnight flight to La Paz, Bolivia, 12,001 feet above sea level. OK for me, living at 8,100 feet; not so sanguine for Scott and Andy. They did survive.

  • A Kittredge woman who dreams of being a full-time professional photographer is a contestant on a locally produced reality show testing six budding photographers in various artistic challenges.

  • Not everyone can see beauty in a stack of weather-beaten, sun-bleached wood. But in the hands of Tommy Banaszek and Jeanne Sullivan, salvaged wood turns over a new leaf and is transformed into handmade furniture.
    KnoT New WooD, located in Kittredge at 26030 Highway 74, is the brainchild of Banaszek and Sullivan, who created the business to showcase wood repurposed into elegant, rustic or highly polished custom designs.
    “People come in here and want to touch all the different woods,” said Sullivan.

  • By Virginia Grantier

    People were standing in the dark Saturday night on a faraway hill in the mountains near Pine as they waited for the children.

    But in the velvet calm of quiet pines and forest floor, just before a fat moon slid into view, it wasn’t so calm for Peg Alig, a naturalist, and for the others waiting on the trail that led to the hilltop observatory.

  • Dave Voth has woodworking in his genes. His great-great-great-grandparents’ relatives were woodworkers in Prussia. His great-grandfather was featured in a book on Mennonite furniture making. The aged black-and-white photograph shows Voth’s ancestor standing next to the wooden house that he built by hand in Minnesota.

  • It’s a chilly October night. Leaves blow outside, and shadows flit across a darkened stage. Or were they only shadows? Creaks and groans fill Center/Stage. Is it just the old building settling? Or is something lurking across the way?

    There’s nothing better than a cold autumn evening to set the mood for a suspense thriller. And there’s nothing better than the Evergreen Players’ latest production of “Night Watch” to leave you looking over your shoulder with fear and delight.

  • Every year, the Center for the Arts Evergreen selects an Arts Person of the Year. The center solicits names from all of the different arts organizations in Evergreen. Nominees are selected from the performing as well as visual arts. This year’s winner, glass artist Kate Loomiller, will be honored at an Evening for the Arts on Oct. 14.

  • What do a 2-foot wooden Viking named Sven, a song about Mad Cow disease and three follicularly challenged men singing “Bald guys are happenin’ ee” have in common? One man ee Wayne Faust.

    The talented singer/songwriter/comedian is appearing at Sammy’s Tavern on Oct. 11. And as disparate as those three things may seem, Faust has a way of making his audiences roll with laughter at all of them.

  • It is a warm “summer” day, even if fall has arrived. While out on the patio enjoying the warm temperature, I noticed several patches of pine resin that were gathering the fallen scales of pine cones in their viscous, gooey puddles. Why, I wondered, are they oozing sap in the fall? Then I remembered that evergreen trees, unlike deciduous trees, retain sap in their evergreen needles (modified leaves) all year. The resin acts like an antifreeze to prevent the needles from being damaged by frost.