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Features

  • “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”
    — Herodotus

    A couple of weeks ago, longtime Evergreen resident Mary Noyes found a curious letter in her mailbox.

  • Jock Spence constructed the bell tower at the Mission of the Transfiguration in 1911. Then, the Army Corps of Engineers restored it in 1978. The 35-foot tower, besides calling families to service, has greeted travelers as they entered Evergreen after driving Highway 74, climbing through Bear Creek Canyon. Many citizens of Evergreen still consider the bell tower one of the gateways of town.

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    The bell tower that stands sentry over the east end of downtown Evergreen is in need of repair, and the Church of the Transfiguration is hoping to get a grant to do the restoration work.

    The tower, originally dedicated on Easter Sunday 1911, was rededicated by the church’s congregation on April 24 to mark its 100th anniversary.

  • An Evergreen woman has started a new business to help people overwhelmed by clutter and mess, or even struggling with just one room full of disorganization.

    Think of that home office that seems perpetually buried in books, papers, boxes and bills. Shows like "Hoarders" on cable's A&E channel have exposed the emotional toll of compulsive collecting.

  • A secluded tree house with all the amenities of a luxury hotel room, including a champagne-bubble hot tub for two, is innkeeper Gail Riley's idea of the picture-perfect romantic getaway.

    After two years of planning and construction and endless hours of shopping, research and thought, the Tree House at Highland Haven Creekside Inn is a reality. As of April 1, a few finishing touches were being added, but the multitude of details finally were complete and reservations were being booked.

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    A young family from Evergreen with a knack for showmanship has won the grand prize over 185 other entries in a national video dance contest sponsored by the Primrose Schools of Atlanta.

    Thanks to the efforts of Rebekah and Schannon Gumz and their son, Aiden, 4, a $30,000 donation will go to Children's Hospital from the Primrose Schools based in Atlanta.

    They also received a $5,000 cash prize, which the family is donating back to Primrose School of Bear Creek in Lakewood, where Aiden goes to day care.

  • Along the north boundary of Mountain Park Homes, a lone chimney still stands below the granite cliffs. It is a fireplace that, for many, marks some of the mystery that was born to a subdivision whose small lots were designed for tents and one-room cabins.

  • Editor’s note: Local paleoclimatologist Peter Link filed this report on a recent trip to Patagonia. His photographs accompany the article.

    By Peter Link

    For the Courier

  • Some people used the words “relocation center” to describe Camp Amache in southeast Colorado, but Kittredge resident Robert Fuchigami calls it what it was to him: a concentration camp.

    Today, his memories of the World War II internment center no longer hold Fuchigami captive; he’s made peace with what happened during the war, when thousands of Japanese-Americans were imprisoned by hatred and suspicion. Today, he’s fascinated with the camp’s history, not bound by his memories of the three years his family spent there.

  • Faye Hess may be almost 93 years old, but she can compete with people half her age when it comes to sewing and making quilts.

    Hess recently completed an enormous quilting project that she is donating to Mt. Evans Hospice, which is holding a raffle to raise money for the hospice.

    Tickets are $10 each or three for $25 and can be purchased online at www.mtevans.org or in person from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3081 Bergen Peak Drive. A drawing will be held on the Fourth of July at the party for the Freedom Run, a benefit for Mt. Evans Hospice.

  • Ten years ago, when Pastor Vera Guebert-Steward was looking for her first job as a minister, she heard about an opening at Evergreen Lutheran Church.

    She had a strong feeling that the church near Marshdale would be the right place for her. When she saw the little buildings and interviewed for the job, she was even more certain. When they offered her the job, it took about 30 seconds to decide.

  • Editor's note: As our country fights its way out of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Clear Creek Courant is remembering those who fought for their very survival through the days following Black Tuesday into the winds of the Dust Bowl and onto the beaches of the Second World War.

    Longtime Empire resident Duane Lewis was 8 when he was given a trumpet and began learning to play music.
    He was 15 years old in 1929 when the stock market crashed, pitching the United States into the dark years of the Great Depression.

  • In addition to maintaining trails in the Clear Creek District of the Arapaho National Forest in the Upper Bear Creek Basin, I enjoyed working on the trails up Grays and Torreys Peaks.

  • By Virginia Grantier

    For the Courier

    The pine trees’ white coats were melting one recent February day, and at times the drip-drip-drip seemed the only sound in Indian Hills.

    Still, there was a hushed but persistent buzz in the foothills hamlet — a buzz that seems to be growing louder in the art world about a log building across the street from the Indian Hills post office.

  • People disposed to romantic musings assure us that this wide world holds one perfect companion for each of us, and the sometimes giddy, sometimes crushing, often humiliating and always hopeful search for that ideal “plus one” has been keeping poets, musicians and florists busy since long before a heartsick Troilus “mounted the Trojan walls, and sighed his soul toward the Grecian tents where Cressida lay that night.”

     

  • Angelique Malet’s birth record reflects that her father, Leon Malet, claimed a nice chunk of native grasslands in Buffalo Park by 1862. Included were meadow hay fields that have been producing and feeding stock for 150 years. They are fields still being harvested today, if the Lord is willing, and if it starts to snow soon. Meadows whose edges provided prime timber for Malet and his fellow French-Canadian neighbors, Samuel and Aszine Veznia, Antione Roy and John Riopelle.

  • If there’s anything to be said about Randy and Sharon Massey, it’s that they’re dedicated to everyone — whether on two legs or four.

    The Soda Creek couple are passionate about taking care of their customers at L&H Auto Body, and just as passionate — or even more so — about taking care of dogs. Sharon is the president of Retriever Rescue of Colorado, and the two have intertwined their callings to take care of auto repair customers and rescued retrievers.

  • Ever since he was 8 years old and tried to stretch the skin of a squirrel on a board, Brad Haddix has been attracted to the ancient art of taxidermy.

  • A Colorado governor whose courageous support of civil rights during World War II is now honored with a tall, rose-colored monument on Kenosha Pass.
    Some 264 miles of U.S. 285 was officially renamed the Ralph Carr Memorial Highway on Sunday in honor of the former governor, who opposed the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.