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Features

  • By Pam Montgomery

    My name is Pam Montgomery, and I’m a foodie. I love anything to do with food: eating it, cooking it, shopping for it, and getting others excited about it. I enjoy discovering a new restaurant or coffee shop, eating meals outside, browsing farmers markets, and even grocery shopping. It’s true. I can wander for a very long time in a produce aisle, take advantage of every taste offered, and always have my eye out for those discount sections hidden in the back.

  • Nita the goose is lonely no more.

    The 7-year-old goose, who lost her mate two months ago has found two new friends, a mated pair named Harry and Sally.

     

    Harry and Sally also are white Chinese geese like Nita, and they came to Nita’s owners, Marie and George McLaughlin of Morrison, through a High Timber Times subscriber.

    “She didn’t want her name used in the paper,” Marie said. The woman had rescued the two geese but she already had chickens, so she didn’t especially want the geese.

  • Friends and family call Evergreen old-timer Louise Stransky Hendryx one of a kind, a strong woman, a lover of animals.

     

    And at 100 years old, Louise is still going strong. Hundreds of well-wishers turned out for her birthday party Sunday at the Church of the Transfiguration.

  • Nicky Hamid has three kids of her own and runs a day-care for six other children ages 2 to 5.

    Peter Foley is retired and lives in Green Ridge Meadows Apartments and doesn't own a car.

     

    One thing they have in common is Call-n-Ride, the curb-to-curb RTD service that takes riders — on-call with an appointment, on a first-come, first-serve basis — to anywhere in a designated service area.

  • Born in Burma 54 years ago, Hla Win loves his native country and still misses it desperately, but he is profoundly grateful to America, the country that took him in as a political refugee.

  • An unusual visitor has for months been leaving diminutive footprints next to the massive famed Iguanodon track fossils on Dinosaur Ridge.

    A greater roadrunner, whom museum staff has named Rascal, was first spotted in early fall, at least 130 miles from the terrestrial bird’s nearest known habitat. The sighting, which has since spurred numerous confirmations by enthusiastic local birdwatchers, prompted Colorado groups to issue rare-bird alerts.

  • Men and women who enjoy dangling on ropes from extremely high and dangerous places like wind turbines came to Evergreen on Saturday for the fifth annual Rope Access Olympics.

     

    Staged in the Alpine Rescue Team headquarters building and the Foothills Fire/Rescue vehicle barn, the event featured some 28 competitors who vied to solve various complicated rope problems.

    The first involved transferring a 220-pound, crash-test dummy to safety while suspended in midair from a spider web of ropes, carabiners and various implements.

  • When Liz Thompson first heard about Habitat for Humanity, she figured she made too much money working full-time as a victim advocate to qualify for the low-cost houses. She had two part-time jobs, as well.

    She thought such houses were for the kind of people she was trying to help on an everyday basis. Then she thought, "I could use a little help too."

  • After looking for the missing hiker in the deep woods for some 32 hours, the searchers had to admit that chances of finding the 74-year-old father and retired insurance executive alive appeared to be approaching zero.

     

    About 60 people were on the ground looking. It was 5:30 p.m. and about to get dark in an hour, meaning the search was getting desperate. Not a single reliable trace of the 5-foot-7, 195-pound outdoorsman had been identified.

  • Members of American Legion Post 2001 of Evergreen celebrated Veterans Day on Saturday, Nov. 12, by dedicating the walkway of brick pavers engraved with the names of those who have served the country's armed forces.

    About 75 people turned out to witness completion of the final phase of a building process that began when legion members decided to build the Veterans and Service Members Commemorative Walk in 2007 in Buchanan Park.

  • The Foothills chapter of the National Charity League spent a Saturday afternoon recently trying to debunk some of the mysteries of car maintenance for a half dozen moms and their teenage daughters.

    The group gathered at Lexota in El Rancho to get two hours of car know-how such as how brakes work, how to check oil and brake fluid, how to change a tire, and how to jump a car battery.

  • Evergreen resident and first-time novelist Jim Ament readily admits that his inaugural effort, “Waiting for Zoe,” isn’t shaped to fit a standard literary mold.

  • My personal style of building custom projects and homes most often has meant an immediate immersement in family matters, followed by a lifetime of friendship. My friendship with Virginia Danver Schulte (May 16, 1946 – Oct. 21, 2011) commenced with a jump-start.

  • Evergreen would blossom every spring shortly after the end of the school year with the opening of the summer homes that had been drained and shuttered into hibernation for the winter. Tire tracks, other than those of the Mountain Protection Association, along with the glow of porch lights, would announce the arrival of family or guests — friends who long ago came for a summer visit and have stayed for generations.

  • “There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.”

    — Mirabel Osler

    It’s a lucky man who discovers his passion early in life.

    It’s a lucky man whose passion can provide his daily pint and pail.

    It’s a lucky man who, after a life of ardent purpose, can look back on a world better for his passion.

  • Editor’s note: As our country fights its way out of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the Courier is remembering those who fought for their very survival through the days following Black Tuesday into the winds of the Dust Bowl and onto the beaches of the Second World War.

    What Ann Binkley remembers about the Great Depression is the hallmark of today's lingering recession. "There were basically no jobs," unless you were working for the railroad, Binkley said.

  • Visiting from distant Oklahoma a couple of weeks ago, 5-year-old Teresa found much about Evergreen to her liking. She liked hiking in a mountain park. She liked collecting pinecones. She liked climbing on rocks. And she particularly liked pedal-boating on Evergreen Lake, with one small proviso.

  • The fun of learning without the agony of grades, exams and papers has inspired Mary Meinig of Evergreen to take 27 courses from Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in the last five years, even though it means driving 19 miles to the center in Lakewood.

     

    Ordinarily, Meinig hates the idea of commuting anywhere. Retired and 72, Meinig doesn't really have to leave home. But the camaraderie and intellectual challenge, not to mention the low price tag, keep her on the road winter, fall and spring.

  • A photographic feast with practical info on the side, "80439: A User's Guide to Evergreen," is an irreverent collection of things that make our mountain community a wacky and wonderful place to live.

     

    Evergreen resident Steve Knapp, an irreverent man in his own right and a former staff writer for the Canyon Courier, has written a softback guidebook to Evergreen that started out to be for newcomers and then grew into something for everybody.

  • Even though the story line in my last column did not reach past the 1930s, I believe I will continue to hang back in Evergreen’s days as a resort village and leave our current events for others to cover. Perhaps then our phone will stop ringing. Besides, it is more fun to share the days when bands were swinging in the ballroom at Troutdale, entertaining guests and employees alike. It’s fun to share information about the 20 other resorts and camps between Clear Creek and Bailey — days that for sure were “then and not now.”