.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  •  Many people who visit Evergreen Christian Outreach for assistance are unemployed. To offer clients a long-term solution and help them get back on their feet, the outreach organization started a jobs center this past spring.

    Evergreen resident Bill Braun is working with others to enhance services offered at the center and to increase opportunities for job seekers.

    “You have to do something to help them achieve self-sufficiency,” said Braun. 

  • It was just about this time of year, 20 years ago, that Scott Mackenzie was getting ready to change the face of Evergreen. The professional contractor and longtime Herzman Mesa resident was beginning one of the most challenging — and most rewarding — projects of his career.

  • The pancakes were flipping, the sausages were warming and the coffee was hot on Saturday as members of the Evergreen Kiwanis served up breakfast, fund-raising and friendship at the Evergreen High School cafeteria.

    Two dozen club members gathered in the wee hours to prepare the meals, set out silent auction items, and prepare raffle and other prizes. Proceeds from the event plus sponsorships from area businesses were expected to net the Kiwanis Foundation more than $13,000. The money is given to two dozen local nonprofits and schools.

  • Mountain-area residents might not have known it, but a war was waged and won on land belonging to one of their neighbors.

    The conflict pit Tupper Briggs, Evergreen resident and hobbyist beekeeper, against neighborhood bears.

    Briggs, who lives on 10 acres near Evergreen Meadows, started keeping bees about eight years ago. He had one year of tranquility before the bruins struck. They sniffed out the honey and the larvae they love to eat and breached Briggs’ hives in a hurry.

  • "Blessed are the piecemakers."
    — Anonymous

    A quilt is an uncommonly generous article.
    In the making it provides companionship and purpose and relaxation. In the giving it imparts warmth and comfort and a bond between souls. In the using it’s a thing of enduring beauty that gives ease to all the senses. In Evergreen, it’s the province of People Comforters, a kindly patchwork of local ladies sewn together with threads of friendship and compassion.

  • Editor’s note: The Courier profiled Kristen Moeller and David Cottrell, who lost their home in the Lower North Fork Fire, at the beginning of April. We have checked on their progress six months after the disaster.

    One step forward and two steps back.

    That’s the best way to describe the past six months for Kristen Moeller and David Cottrell, who lost their home in the Lower North Fork Fire. Moeller says they still have good and bad days after the devastating fire, which started six months ago today.

  • By Pam Montgomery

  • Favored with a vast store of infallible opinions and skin of purest alabaster, I don’t get out of the hermitage that often. But if my prudent seclusion helps ensure a creamier complexion and more temperate foothills social climate, it tends to leave me in the dark about many of my neighbors’ diverse and interesting activities.

  • Elk Creek firefighters spent two days recently practicing rope rescues in anticipation of the October opening of Staunton State Park.

    The park will be home to several rock-climbing routes near Staunton Rocks, and firefighters anticipate calls from park users, said Alex Parks, the department’s technical rescue coordinator and a firefighter/EMT. Crews have been familiarizing themselves with the park’s layout over the last two years, including at the Aug. 18-19 training session.

  • “The guy who’s riding a $1,000 bicycle is not going to stop if he doesn’t have a way to secure it,” says Kittredge resident Jerry Smith.

    Representing the Lariat Loop Alliance, Smith is contacting businesses and agencies in Evergreen and Kittredge to generate interest in placing creatively designed bike racks on their properties.

    “The bicycle racks accommodate people and give them a place to park,” Smith said.

  • The thought actually hit me earlier in the week that 19 years before, as a mere 21-year-old in Craigsville, Va., of all places, I stepped into a professional wrestling ring for the first time as a referee. But that's not where my love affair with what is now more prominently called sports entertainment began.

  • Lots and lots of bubbles constituted the theme of a two-hour class attended by more than a half-dozen children last week.

    The kids played with bubble makers and soap at the Hiwan History Museum, creating huge bubbles, tiny bubbles, square bubbles and triangle bubbles. They learned how to catch them and put their arms through them — all while being outdoors and having fun.

    Although bubble making was entertaining for the youngsters, it was a learning opportunity, too.

  • Conifer High School senior Reggie Dickhoff is raising funds for an Eagle Scout project to build wheelchair-accessible picnic tables for the fishing deck at Evergreen Lake.

  • Father and son both have the same intense look in their eyes, the same drive toward excellence. Both Glenn and Cameron Vogel hold Teenage Mr. America titles.

    A few years have gone by between the Vogel men’s titles.
    Nineteen-year-old Cameron placed first in his category two weeks ago during the Mr. America competition of the International Natural Bodybuilding Association in Secaucus, N.J. His father, Glenn, now 54, achieved the same title in 1977 while competing in Boston.

  • Samuel and Daniel Fleming’s heritage was Irish, and their life craft was quarrying sandstone. The two brothers found work near Columbus, Ohio, at a quarry owned by Mr. Garfield.

  • Want some palaver with your pizza? A side of conversation with your calzone? Care to wash down your baked ziti with a frosty glass of sparkling repartee?

     

  • Royalty.
    Yours truly.
    No, seriously.
    And I don’t mean royalty like that Johnny-come-lately Windsor crew. I’m talking about a divine right stretching back to the dim and darkly days when the dapper Duke of Cambridge’s clan wore mostly dirt and ate boiled peat for breakfast, lunch and tiffin. But hey, I’m not here to run down my noble cousins.

  •  Susan Lams, 67, met her new husband, retired truck driver Carl Wuertley, 77, while she was working as a personal care provider in his apartment near Little Cub Creek a couple of years ago.

    But the romance didn't really ignite until around Valentine's Day of this year, when he decided to ask her out to dinner at the Bear Creek Tavern in Kittredge.

    Wuertley said he had been getting little hints that maybe their relationship was about something more than just housecleaner and tenant, such as a birthday card with a personal message.

  • By Pam Montgomery

    My name is Pam Montgomery, and I’m a foodie. I love anything to do with food: eating it, cooking it, shopping for it, and getting others excited about it. I enjoy discovering a new restaurant or coffee shop, eating meals outside, browsing farmers markets, and even grocery shopping. It’s true. I can wander for a very long time in a produce aisle, take advantage of every taste offered, and always have my eye out for those discount sections hidden in the back.