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Features

  • On a chilly Saturday afternoon, Rachel Emmer walks briskly across a large, smooth field in Buchanan Park where vegetables and other plants will be growing in the not-too-distant future.

     

    “We’re so excited to be at this stage,” Emmer said about the long-range community garden project.

    After six years of planning, Emmer, interim executive director of Evergreen’s Alliance for Sustainability, and others involved in the project are finally seeing the garden take shape.

  • Dear Gracie Maeve:

  • “We had discovered an accursed country. We had found the Home of the Blizzard.”

    — Douglas Mawson

    Here’s the thing about things — they can always be worse.

  • When development threatened to turn their paradise into parking lots, the people of Jefferson County decided to preserve the beautiful landscapes they treasured before open land became subdivision material.

  • On March 26 of last year, hell came to 4,000 acres 6 miles south of Conifer.

    As the battle to fully control the Lower North Fork Fire continued for a week, residents waited and watched as they learned about three neighbors who lost their lives and homeowners who lost everything in a blaze that was sparked when a prescribed burn escaped in high winds.

  • One year after a state-overseen prescribed burn re-ignited in high winds and torched 4,100 acres south of Conifer, officials have made several changes to address some of the glitches in procedures and protocols that were apparent during the horrific blaze.

    But for victims of the Lower North Fork Fire last March, the changes have amounted to too little, and have come decidedly too late.

  • One year after a state-overseen prescribed burn re-ignited in high winds and torched 4,100 acres south of Conifer, officials have made several changes to address some of the glitches in procedures and protocols that were apparent during the horrific blaze.

    But for victims of the Lower North Fork Fire last March, the changes have amounted to too little, and have come decidedly too late.

  • Quigley is Evergreen Meadows’ new best friend.

    The 4-year-old soft-coated Wheaten terrier saved the subdivision along Highway 73 from a wildfire on March 18. He was honored Monday night by Evergreen firefighters for his keen sense of smell and perseverance in getting his owner to walk across the backyard and find flames in a pile of dry pine needles on a neighbor’s property. The fire ignited after ashes that weren’t completely cooled had been thrown out, and the wind re-ignited them.

  • It was a fitting four-leaf clover at the Rotary Club of Conifer’s fourth annual St. Patrick’s Day fund-raiser: tasty food, friendly companions, delectable drink and a worthy cause.

    St. Laurence Episcopal, which serves as a church 364 days a year, took a day off March 16 and dressed up as an Irish pub — complete with furnished tables, signs, balloons and lights strung around the walls.

    “The energy is just amazing,” said Rotary president Suzanne Barkley. “It just feels great in here.”

  • When Doris and John Zesbaugh retired and moved to Evergreen 16 years ago, little did they know that they would take on nearly a full-time job to help the homeless.

    The couple, both 83, work tirelessly on behalf of a soup kitchen called Street Reach that is operated out of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in downtown Denver.

  • Many people in Evergreen knew Robert “Bob” Greenwood as a good neighbor and volunteer coach at the high school. 

    Perhaps not as well known are Greenwood’s accomplishments in professional and collegiate sports. An Ohio native with a passion for athletics, Greenwood played football for the Cleveland Rams in the 1940s. He also competed in football and track at Ohio University before transferring to Kent State, from which he graduated.

    Greenwood gained the most recognition for his abilities as a college basketball coach.

  • After moving to Evergreen 20 years ago, George Mather transformed his deep appreciation for the natural world into efforts to preserve the Colorado wilderness and its rich history.

     

  • Rebuilding a life doesn’t come cheap.
    Families who lost homes in the Lower North Fork Fire are juggling costs such as land reclamation, tree removal, and architectural plans and construction for those who want to rebuild on their properties, and house hunting costs for those who don’t.

  • There’s nothing quite like the smell of simmering chicken soup.

    Now, imagine the smell of 19 chicken soups simmering in slow cookers as part of the second annual Chicken Soup Challenge.

    On Saturday night, seven tables lined with slow cookers filled a large room at Congregation Beth Evergreen, where soup aficionados from Evergreen slurped soup, chatted and had a good time.

  • By Alison Mahnken
    For the Courier
    Hang gliders and paragliders catching the currents at Lookout Mountain are enjoying the fruits of their joint labors with Jefferson County Open Space: an upgraded trail to the popular launch site on Windy Saddle.
    The airborne adventurers earn their rides by hauling gear weighing up to 80 pounds to the launch area — and a deteriorating foot trail was making that undertaking both unsafe and unpleasant.

  •  Many people who visit Evergreen Christian Outreach for assistance are unemployed. To offer clients a long-term solution and help them get back on their feet, the outreach organization started a jobs center this past spring.

    Evergreen resident Bill Braun is working with others to enhance services offered at the center and to increase opportunities for job seekers.

    “You have to do something to help them achieve self-sufficiency,” said Braun. 

  • It was just about this time of year, 20 years ago, that Scott Mackenzie was getting ready to change the face of Evergreen. The professional contractor and longtime Herzman Mesa resident was beginning one of the most challenging — and most rewarding — projects of his career.

  • The pancakes were flipping, the sausages were warming and the coffee was hot on Saturday as members of the Evergreen Kiwanis served up breakfast, fund-raising and friendship at the Evergreen High School cafeteria.

    Two dozen club members gathered in the wee hours to prepare the meals, set out silent auction items, and prepare raffle and other prizes. Proceeds from the event plus sponsorships from area businesses were expected to net the Kiwanis Foundation more than $13,000. The money is given to two dozen local nonprofits and schools.

  • Mountain-area residents might not have known it, but a war was waged and won on land belonging to one of their neighbors.

    The conflict pit Tupper Briggs, Evergreen resident and hobbyist beekeeper, against neighborhood bears.

    Briggs, who lives on 10 acres near Evergreen Meadows, started keeping bees about eight years ago. He had one year of tranquility before the bruins struck. They sniffed out the honey and the larvae they love to eat and breached Briggs’ hives in a hurry.

  • "Blessed are the piecemakers."
    — Anonymous

    A quilt is an uncommonly generous article.
    In the making it provides companionship and purpose and relaxation. In the giving it imparts warmth and comfort and a bond between souls. In the using it’s a thing of enduring beauty that gives ease to all the senses. In Evergreen, it’s the province of People Comforters, a kindly patchwork of local ladies sewn together with threads of friendship and compassion.