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Features

  • Firefighter Terri McLaughlin is one of several women in the Evergreen Volunteer Fire Department who respond to calls, including those for wildland fires.

     

    A couple of weeks ago, McLaughlin and Evergreen firefighters Jeff Ashford, Byrne McKenna and Bill Atkins joined multiple mutual-aid crews working to contain the massive Black Forest Fire in Colorado Springs.

    “On the first day, we had live fire on top of us,” McLaughlin said. “We went to homes and worked on what could be saved.”

  • Scuba diving off the coast of California inspired Ryan Lockwood to write his first novel, a thriller set in the vast ocean.

     

    “I’d always wanted to write a novel. I really just dove into it,” said Lockwood, who grew up in Evergreen.

    Lockwood’s book, titled “Below,” is officially hitting the shelves at area bookstores this week. 

    “It’s based on a real-world current event,” said Lockwood.

  • About a dozen children sat around a campfire at the United Methodist Church of Evergreen on Sunday morning to talk about Father’s Day and how important dads are.

    Inside the sanctuary.

    Surrounded by cowboy hats, saddles, tack and horse statues.

  • Sometimes Evergreen’s hometown heroes aren’t necessarily in Evergreen.

    For Brownie Girl Scout Troop 3110, this year’s hometown heroes were at Children’s Hospital. The Bergen Valley third-grade girls recently honored the doctors and nurses in the hospital’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders who have been taking care of troop member Kaymen Story.

  • Staunton State Park’s much-anticipated opening weekend didn’t disappoint.

    “It’s been crazy getting ready for this, but seeing people happy has made all of the blood, sweat and tears worth it,” said Jennifer Anderson, the park manager. “I couldn’t have asked for the weekend to be better.”

  • The weather last Wednesday morning was perfect for fly-fishing: slightly overcast, a slight nip in the air with calm winds — and it was a perfect day for a group of Evergreen Middle School sixth-graders to try the sport.

    Thirty students in the Recreation Sports class, with the help of several teachers and a few Evergreen Trout Unlimited volunteers, gathered around the Buchanan ponds to fish for rainbow trout. In 2½ hours, the students caught and released about a half-dozen fish.

  • It’s pretty obvious that an organization called Girls on the Run teaches girls how to run.

    But that’s only a small part of what girls in Girls on the Run does.

    The girls in third through fifth grade do community service projects, support each other and learn valuable lessons about navigating the challenges of their teen years.

  • Occasionally, when Evergreen Middle School science teacher Jeff McCarthy says goodbye to a class of students, he offers an offhand salute.

    He likens it to a gesture that late-night television comedian Johnny Carson often made to his right-hand man, Ed McMahon. It’s a sign of respect, a sign of farewell.

    McCarthy may make that offhand salute on May 30, the last day of this school year, when he says goodbye to his last class of eighth-graders. McCarthy, 63, is retiring after 35 years of teaching, 21 of them at EMS.

  • Bergen Meadow kindergartners learned about biology and life on a farm by watching eggs hatch into tiny chicks for the past few weeks.

    The first chick pecked its way out of its egg on April 29, and the children were enthralled with the sight of new life.

    Hatching eggs is an annual event at Bergen Meadow, and older students get excited as they relive the time when the eggs hatched in their kindergarten classrooms.

    Peggy Miller, the school’s principal, even donned a chicken hat that morning to signal the event.

  • On a chilly Saturday afternoon, Rachel Emmer walks briskly across a large, smooth field in Buchanan Park where vegetables and other plants will be growing in the not-too-distant future.

     

    “We’re so excited to be at this stage,” Emmer said about the long-range community garden project.

    After six years of planning, Emmer, interim executive director of Evergreen’s Alliance for Sustainability, and others involved in the project are finally seeing the garden take shape.

  • Dear Gracie Maeve:

  • “We had discovered an accursed country. We had found the Home of the Blizzard.”

    — Douglas Mawson

    Here’s the thing about things — they can always be worse.

  • When development threatened to turn their paradise into parking lots, the people of Jefferson County decided to preserve the beautiful landscapes they treasured before open land became subdivision material.

  • On March 26 of last year, hell came to 4,000 acres 6 miles south of Conifer.

    As the battle to fully control the Lower North Fork Fire continued for a week, residents waited and watched as they learned about three neighbors who lost their lives and homeowners who lost everything in a blaze that was sparked when a prescribed burn escaped in high winds.

  • One year after a state-overseen prescribed burn re-ignited in high winds and torched 4,100 acres south of Conifer, officials have made several changes to address some of the glitches in procedures and protocols that were apparent during the horrific blaze.

    But for victims of the Lower North Fork Fire last March, the changes have amounted to too little, and have come decidedly too late.

  • One year after a state-overseen prescribed burn re-ignited in high winds and torched 4,100 acres south of Conifer, officials have made several changes to address some of the glitches in procedures and protocols that were apparent during the horrific blaze.

    But for victims of the Lower North Fork Fire last March, the changes have amounted to too little, and have come decidedly too late.

  • Quigley is Evergreen Meadows’ new best friend.

    The 4-year-old soft-coated Wheaten terrier saved the subdivision along Highway 73 from a wildfire on March 18. He was honored Monday night by Evergreen firefighters for his keen sense of smell and perseverance in getting his owner to walk across the backyard and find flames in a pile of dry pine needles on a neighbor’s property. The fire ignited after ashes that weren’t completely cooled had been thrown out, and the wind re-ignited them.

  • It was a fitting four-leaf clover at the Rotary Club of Conifer’s fourth annual St. Patrick’s Day fund-raiser: tasty food, friendly companions, delectable drink and a worthy cause.

    St. Laurence Episcopal, which serves as a church 364 days a year, took a day off March 16 and dressed up as an Irish pub — complete with furnished tables, signs, balloons and lights strung around the walls.

    “The energy is just amazing,” said Rotary president Suzanne Barkley. “It just feels great in here.”

  • When Doris and John Zesbaugh retired and moved to Evergreen 16 years ago, little did they know that they would take on nearly a full-time job to help the homeless.

    The couple, both 83, work tirelessly on behalf of a soup kitchen called Street Reach that is operated out of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in downtown Denver.

  • Many people in Evergreen knew Robert “Bob” Greenwood as a good neighbor and volunteer coach at the high school. 

    Perhaps not as well known are Greenwood’s accomplishments in professional and collegiate sports. An Ohio native with a passion for athletics, Greenwood played football for the Cleveland Rams in the 1940s. He also competed in football and track at Ohio University before transferring to Kent State, from which he graduated.

    Greenwood gained the most recognition for his abilities as a college basketball coach.