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Features

  • The Mountain Resource Center hosts its Empty Bowls fund-raiser every year, but the title is a bit misleading.

    Contrary to the name, there wasn’t an empty seat or bowl at the annual events last Wednesday and Thursday.

    “What makes this event great is that it’s all about the community coming together,” said Mary Alice Cohen, MRC programs and operations director.

  • A fund-raiser held Saturday to help those in the Evergreen area impacted by the September flooding exceeded expectations and was the epitome of the word “community.”

    Organizers of the event at the Elks Lodge lost count of the number of people who attended, but they estimate it was between 550 and 700. Some say it might have been the largest function ever held at the Elks Lodge.

  • It may be a bit early to start thinking about those special trees we cherish in December, but it's never the wrong time to remember your loved ones.

  • A large, furry rattlesnake was lying in wait for unsuspecting youngsters to appear on the trail at Lookout Mountain Nature Center on Saturday afternoon.

    “You know what I do?” the reptile said when the kids met up with him. “I smell with my tongue. When I see a mouse, I take my two fangs and zap it with a bit of venom. And I eat it up.”

    Decked out in their Halloween costumes, the kids seemed impressed with the snake’s skills, as well as his wealth of knowledge.

  • Five area nonprofit organizations recently combined efforts to attract business to their thrift stores.

    "We held a treasure hunt and encouraged everyone to visit each store on the map, get a sticker, and enjoy the many specials and treasures at each location," said Sharon Smith, executive director of Evergreen Christian Outreach. "Our goal was to encourage folks to shop locally and discover the 'hidden treasures' that could be found."

  • “If you give a man a fish, he is hungry again in an hour; if you teach him to catch a fish, you do him a good turn."

    — Anne Isabella Ritchie

    Friendship Bridge is not about giving food to poor women in Guatemala; it is about doing a good turn by helping them start businesses, so they can feed their own families.

  • If you ask Warren Rose what his favorite day of the week is, he’ll say it’s Tuesday.
    That’s because he dedicates Tuesdays to volunteering at the Seniors’ Resource Center in Evergreen — and making many new friends.
    “I look forward to going in there on my volunteer days and seeing my friends,” Rose said.
    Now in its 35th year, SRC’s mission is to coordinate services to enhance independence, dignity and quality of life for seniors.

  • An Evergreen couple are participating in a cycling event, but it’s not your everyday bike ride: It’s a 350-mile benefit through — and for — Israel.

    It’s also a journey back to their roots.

    Jonathan and Beth Miller, members of Congregation Beth Evergreen, are raising money for the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and a nonprofit organization called Hazon, both of which promote healthy living and sustainability in Israel.

  • "I love babies," said Evergreen resident Kathy Magnani.
    In the past 10 years, Magnani has spent more that 850 hours giving comfort to tiny infants in the neonatal intensive-care unit at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center in Denver. Each Thursday morning, she goes to the hospital and holds a baby for two hours.
    "My job is to go in to cuddle these babies," Magnani said with a big smile.

  • It is an apparently immutable law of hydrology that each uncommon rise in the waters of Bear Creek is attended by a simultaneous and equal rise in public anxiety regarding Evergreen Dam.

  • Hundreds of Männer, Frauen und Kinder packed Buchanan Park for the fourth annual Oktoberfest on Sunday for some traditional German fare, music, food and, of course, beer.

    The event was originally scheduled for Sept. 22 at the Evergreen Lake House, but the date and location were changed because of September’s flooding and the resulting damage.

  • Despite a preview of winter the day before, Aspen Ridge Church in Marshdale staged a successful Hay Day fall festival on Saturday. 

    The four-hour gathering at the church featured everything from local food and crafts to a pumpkin patch, hayrides and animal feedings, with free hot cider and chili to chase the chill.

  • For 15 years, the “Mountain Man” bronze sculpture has stood below the Evergreen Lake dam, a silent tribute to the resilience of the pioneers who settled Colorado, particularly Evergreen.

    In 2013, in the wake of September’s incessant rain and subsequent flooding of Bear Creek, the sculpture continues to pay tribute to the resilience of flood victims in Evergreen and Colorado.

    The sculpture of a mountain man on a horse going down a steep rocky slope is 11 feet tall and is mounted on a 3-foot pedestal. It was front-hoof-deep in water on Sept. 13.

  • A book written by an Evergreen High School graduate and one of her middle school teachers has a simple but important message: People can overcome challenges in their lives.

    The student, Kristina Halstead, has been in a wheelchair all her life and has struggled to manage the activities of daily living, She graduated from EHS in 2012. Her co-author is Dale Lidicker, the special-education teacher who was her primary teacher and caregiver while she was a student at Evergreen Middle School.

  • The Seniors’ Resource Center in Evergreen was filled with people celebrating the organization’s 35th anniversary of service to the community on the evening of Sept. 25.

     

    Among the guests was 92-year-old Edna Stuver Webster, a retired Denver doctor who said the most important thing in life is having good health. Known as “Dr. Edna” to those acquainted with her, she is a longtime supporter of the organization dating from 1978.

  • When life gives you lemons, make lemonade

    Melissa Wood, owner of Madera Salon, had to close her shop temporarily above Cactus Jack’s Saloon, thanks to the recent flooding that heavily damaged the first floor of the building.

    Since Wood can’t serve clients at her shop, she decided to give back to the community with her talents: She’s giving free haircuts to clients of Evergreen Christian Outreach.

    “I just decided with the flooding and everything, this was a time when people are needing more help,” Wood said.

  • “I still have that vivid picture in my mind of Boston,” said Army veteran Paul Heiser as he recalled embarking on a ship headed for England in the midst of World War II. “We zigzagged across the Atlantic on the USS Mount Vernon,” he said.

     

    Heiser was reminiscing with four other members of the 124th Anti-aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion of the U.S. Army, who had come to Evergreen for their annual gathering.

  • Singing as they piloted wheelbarrows filled with compost, members of Boy Scout Troop 888 were hard at work at the community garden in Buchanan Park on Sunday morning.

    “You have to use brute force,” Dillon Mathues said to another Scout who was unloading a pile of compost they were moving.

    The Scouts were learning how to create and manage compost to earn gardening merit badges and advance in their ranks. They also seemed to be having a good time while chopping discarded plants to make more compost.

  • Two young Nubian goats received names from their new foster parents at the close of the Hay Days Harvest Festival at the Humphrey Memorial Park and Museum on Saturday.

     

    Kerrigan and Nancy Clough won the goat-naming contest and decided on “Bramble” and “Raspberry” as the monikers for the frisky, curious kids.

    After the naming, Bramble and Raspberry ran over to eat grain from their new parents, who had participated in the contest designed to raise funds for the goats’ food.

  • The Conifer Blues Festival rocked Norm Meyer’s ranch on Saturday and left everyone on a high note.

    The festival, celebrating its third year, raised money for the I Love U Guys Foundation, which creates and promotes safety programs for schools during emergencies.

    In September 2006, a gunman entered Platte Canyon High School and fatally shot student Emily Keyes. The I Love U Guys Foundation was named after Emily’s last text-message to her parents.

    Emily’s parents, Ellen and John-Michael Keyes, started the foundation in 2009.