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Features

  • Girls and boys dressed in their holiday best waited excitedly for their chance to visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus on Saturday at the fifth annual Breakfast With Santa.

    The Evergreen Lake House was filled with children of all ages and their parents, who ate a breakfast of pancakes, eggs and sausage, followed by a wait in line to sit on Santa’s lap.

    Cameras were in abundance as Santa and Mrs. Claus posed with the kids.

    It was a fun day for the 250 people who attended the event sponsored by the Evergreen Downtown Business Association.

  • The Bluebell Fire that started June 3 in Evergreen saw first responders working around the clock to keep the flames at bay, and to their surprise — amid all the chaos and danger — a lemonade stand appeared nearby to quench their thirsts.

  • It all happened so fast.

    One second the young elk buck was sticking his nose through the half-closed safety netting surrounding Greg and Shauna Chase’s backyard trampoline, licking snow off the canvas. The next he was bouncing around inside it, looking equal parts surprised, confused and delighted.

    “It never happened before,” says Greg. “We have elk in the yard all the time, but they never showed any interest in the tramp.”

  • Evergreen businessman Jim Sherwood has had the task this week of making people cry — and laugh, and shout for joy.

    Sherwood, who was the impetus behind a fund-raising event Nov. 2 at the Elks Lodge that raised $30,000 for victims of the September flooding in Evergreen, hand-delivered most of the 27 checks early this week.

    On Monday morning, he met with the owners of Cactus Jack’s Saloon and several of its employees, plus the building owner, to present checks.

    Sherwood declined to say how much each person received.

  • Two local knitting supply shops, Yarn West in Evergreen and the Knit Knook in Conifer, have joined forces this year with a national charity to collect knitted hats, scarves, blankets and other items for Denver's homeless.
    Community Purls, a project formed under the umbrella of the charity Women4Women-Knitting4Peace, is calling on area knitters and crocheters to create blankets, hats and other items for the homeless and needy in Denver.

  • Rob Molholm, Evergreen High’s head football coach, wears on his right middle finger the ring he received when the Wheat Ridge High School Farmers won the state championship in 1996.

    He wears it as a reminder of what it takes to be a state champion, and he’s set that lofty goal for his Evergreen Cougars. EHS has never won a state football championship.

    “It has a special place in my heart, and it reminds me of what I’m striving for,” he said of the ring.

  • The Mountain Resource Center hosts its Empty Bowls fund-raiser every year, but the title is a bit misleading.

    Contrary to the name, there wasn’t an empty seat or bowl at the annual events last Wednesday and Thursday.

    “What makes this event great is that it’s all about the community coming together,” said Mary Alice Cohen, MRC programs and operations director.

  • A fund-raiser held Saturday to help those in the Evergreen area impacted by the September flooding exceeded expectations and was the epitome of the word “community.”

    Organizers of the event at the Elks Lodge lost count of the number of people who attended, but they estimate it was between 550 and 700. Some say it might have been the largest function ever held at the Elks Lodge.

  • It may be a bit early to start thinking about those special trees we cherish in December, but it's never the wrong time to remember your loved ones.

  • A large, furry rattlesnake was lying in wait for unsuspecting youngsters to appear on the trail at Lookout Mountain Nature Center on Saturday afternoon.

    “You know what I do?” the reptile said when the kids met up with him. “I smell with my tongue. When I see a mouse, I take my two fangs and zap it with a bit of venom. And I eat it up.”

    Decked out in their Halloween costumes, the kids seemed impressed with the snake’s skills, as well as his wealth of knowledge.

  • Five area nonprofit organizations recently combined efforts to attract business to their thrift stores.

    "We held a treasure hunt and encouraged everyone to visit each store on the map, get a sticker, and enjoy the many specials and treasures at each location," said Sharon Smith, executive director of Evergreen Christian Outreach. "Our goal was to encourage folks to shop locally and discover the 'hidden treasures' that could be found."

  • “If you give a man a fish, he is hungry again in an hour; if you teach him to catch a fish, you do him a good turn."

    — Anne Isabella Ritchie

    Friendship Bridge is not about giving food to poor women in Guatemala; it is about doing a good turn by helping them start businesses, so they can feed their own families.

  • If you ask Warren Rose what his favorite day of the week is, he’ll say it’s Tuesday.
    That’s because he dedicates Tuesdays to volunteering at the Seniors’ Resource Center in Evergreen — and making many new friends.
    “I look forward to going in there on my volunteer days and seeing my friends,” Rose said.
    Now in its 35th year, SRC’s mission is to coordinate services to enhance independence, dignity and quality of life for seniors.

  • An Evergreen couple are participating in a cycling event, but it’s not your everyday bike ride: It’s a 350-mile benefit through — and for — Israel.

    It’s also a journey back to their roots.

    Jonathan and Beth Miller, members of Congregation Beth Evergreen, are raising money for the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and a nonprofit organization called Hazon, both of which promote healthy living and sustainability in Israel.

  • "I love babies," said Evergreen resident Kathy Magnani.
    In the past 10 years, Magnani has spent more that 850 hours giving comfort to tiny infants in the neonatal intensive-care unit at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center in Denver. Each Thursday morning, she goes to the hospital and holds a baby for two hours.
    "My job is to go in to cuddle these babies," Magnani said with a big smile.

  • It is an apparently immutable law of hydrology that each uncommon rise in the waters of Bear Creek is attended by a simultaneous and equal rise in public anxiety regarding Evergreen Dam.

  • Hundreds of Männer, Frauen und Kinder packed Buchanan Park for the fourth annual Oktoberfest on Sunday for some traditional German fare, music, food and, of course, beer.

    The event was originally scheduled for Sept. 22 at the Evergreen Lake House, but the date and location were changed because of September’s flooding and the resulting damage.

  • Despite a preview of winter the day before, Aspen Ridge Church in Marshdale staged a successful Hay Day fall festival on Saturday. 

    The four-hour gathering at the church featured everything from local food and crafts to a pumpkin patch, hayrides and animal feedings, with free hot cider and chili to chase the chill.

  • For 15 years, the “Mountain Man” bronze sculpture has stood below the Evergreen Lake dam, a silent tribute to the resilience of the pioneers who settled Colorado, particularly Evergreen.

    In 2013, in the wake of September’s incessant rain and subsequent flooding of Bear Creek, the sculpture continues to pay tribute to the resilience of flood victims in Evergreen and Colorado.

    The sculpture of a mountain man on a horse going down a steep rocky slope is 11 feet tall and is mounted on a 3-foot pedestal. It was front-hoof-deep in water on Sept. 13.

  • A book written by an Evergreen High School graduate and one of her middle school teachers has a simple but important message: People can overcome challenges in their lives.

    The student, Kristina Halstead, has been in a wheelchair all her life and has struggled to manage the activities of daily living, She graduated from EHS in 2012. Her co-author is Dale Lidicker, the special-education teacher who was her primary teacher and caregiver while she was a student at Evergreen Middle School.