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Features

  • Reaching the summit of a high mountain peak is secondary to maintaining good relationships with fellow climbers, said George Lowe, a mountaineer with more than 50 years experience.

    “The brotherhood of the rope is incredibly important to me,” Lowe said during his presentation at Mount Vernon Country Club on April 16. “The most critical message I want to leave is the companionship.”

  • Whipped cream and a red cherry made of artist's clay top the brightly colored “Court Jester Delight” ceramic egg on display at Evergreen National Bank.

    A dark yellow egg yolk is a stand-out feature of the “Half-Baked” ceramic egg. The “Snowflake” egg features intricate hand-painted snowflakes on a deep blue background.

    The three duck-egg-size eggs, along with about 150 more, are part of Evergreen’s seventh annual egg-decorating contest, a fund-raiser for the Evergreen Downtown Business Association.

  • Shelby Foley and Brandon Bianco have learned many life lessons in the five weeks since their 10-month-old son, Kai, was bitten by the family dog.

    They learned firsthand that life can change in an instant.

    They witnessed the kindness of paramedics, sheriff’s deputies and medical professionals, plus the outpouring of support that is typical for Evergreen.

    And, above all, they learned to trust that their son will recover, and they will weather the medical bills and the uncertainty of Kai’s future.

  • Blitz is back home.

    Denverite Kate Townsend was reunited with her small black Lab on April 1 after a family in the neighborhood south of Mount Falcon took Blitz in. The dog had been lost lost for 44 days, since she chased a deer Feb. 16 while Townsend was hiking with friends at Mount Falcon Open Space.

  • The sounds of groans and bodies hitting the floor emanated from Colorado Children’s Theatre on Sunday — along with a lot of laughter — as 20 young actors learned the art of stage combat.

    They learned how to fall – theatrically, of course – and how to throw a punch that looks realistic but doesn’t hurt the recipient. They also used swimming “noodles” as mock swords to learn how to perform a choreographed sword fight.

  • Saturday was all about the rites of spring at the Humphrey History Park and Museum.

    Visitors learned the basics of raising goats and composting, participated in a seed and chicken swap, and learned about raising herbs, making cheese and spinning thread during the Great Humphrey Animal and Seed Swap.

  • Bill Yearsley talks about his house with a sense of pride.

    It’s more than simple ownership. He designed his home off Kerr Gulch Road, and it's about as green as a home can get.

    “This house came out of my passion for sustainable design,” said Yearsley, who was in the engineering and construction industry for 30 years. “It’s built using materials that will last. I’d like to think there’s nothing else like it in the Jeffco community.”

  • After learning of mountain area residents  who couldn't fill out job applications because they lacked English language skills, a group of volunteers formed the Mountain Reads program.

    Since the program started last year, the tutors have worked with several individuals, helping them improve their ability to speak, read and write. Now the group is seeking more participants for Mountain Reads, which area Rotary clubs sponsor.

  • Highway 73 just north of Marshdale has its gnome back, though this time it’s a ladies-only situation.

    Maminka the female gnome now sits proudly outside the house that has been famous over the years for its iconic gnomes. The male gnome, Gnomie, was stolen more than a year ago, much to the dismay of owner Andre Yerkes, neighbors and motorists who drive up and down the highway.

  • Marshdale Elementary fourth-graders were rocket scientists for a day on Monday when they used their scientific-inquiry skills to make and launch rockets from soda bottles.

    They had help from real rocket scientists from Centennial-based United Launch Alliance, who told them about rockets and satellites, then helped them with their rockets.

    ULA, a joint subsidiary of Lockheed Martin and Boeing Co., launches a variety of government and commercial payloads using Atlas and Delta rockets.

  • The authors who attended the inaugural Authors Fair at Bergen Valley Elementary School on Friday didn’t simply read their books to the students; they inspired the children to write about their passions and to dream.

    “It was 10 years before I showed (my book) to anyone,” children’s author Suzanne Brown, a Bergens parent, told a class of third-graders, “and they asked when was I going to get it published. And if you don’t try, you don’t succeed, right?” she asked the students.

  • This year’s musical at Evergreen Middle School combines the new with the familiar.

    New this year for the production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” is Tom Biaso, an eighth-grader who accompanies the singers on piano. In past years, the music has been provided via recordings or a professional accompanist.

  • An Evergreen sculptor who found his muse in our mountain town hopes to carve a bigger spot for Evergreen on the national arts scene.

    Errol Beauchamp, a 22-year local resident, left his job as a corporate designer 12 years ago to focus on his art. He’s traveled and worked internationally but says Evergreen has the arts attributes needed to perform on the big stage.

  • Olympic cross-country skier Noah Hoffman has fond memories of playing behind the Hiwan Homestead Museum and at Bergen Meadow Elementary School as a youngster.

    Hoffman, 24, who lived in Indian Hills and then in Evergreen until he was 7, is a member of the U.S. Nordic ski team and is competing in three events in Sochi, Russia. So far, he has placed 35th in the cross-country men’s skiathlon and 31st in the cross-country men’s classic. 

  • The “Corset-Out Fashion Show” that had been scheduled to hit the runway this month in the Timbervale Barn behind the Hiwan Homestead Museum was postponed because of chilly temperatures.

    While the exhibit is on display now, the formal — and frilly kickoff has been delayed to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 8 — weather permitting.

    For information or tickets to the show, call Hiwan Homestead program coordinator Meghan Vickers at 720-497-7650 or Lee Michels of Monarch Productions at 303-975-1151. 

  • A family new to Evergreen is overwhelmed by the outpouring of support they’ve received in the wake of a fire that severely damaged their home — including efforts to keep a son’s impending wedding on track.

    The Bruce family moved to Evergreen last summer and into a home on Armadillo Trail off Highway 73 — the house that caught fire last month when wood framing around the chimney ignited and sent the Bruces fleeing into a chilly evening with only the clothes they were wearing.

  • Gerry Schulte once lived in a tent. Then he built a water district.

    Schulte and his wife landed in Colorado in the mid-1970s with few possessions. And now, when looking back at his 37 years at the helm of the Evergreen Metropolitan District, his fondest memory is of one possession the district acquired: a sludge truck.

  • Evergreen resident Judy Berna travels, skis, works at the Wulf and Buchanan rec centers, and has written a book. She is also missing a foot — and looking for others who might be missing limbs, too.

    Berna was born with a mild form of spina bifida, caused when some vertebrae don’t fully form and leave the spinal cord vulnerable to damage. A series of operations left Berna’s spinal cord unable to send signals to her left foot, which became deformed over time.

    As a child, she would dream of having a foot transplant.

  • Jackie Delafose, assistant principal at Conifer High School, was among African-American students who were bused to white schools in the early 1970s.

    Delafose began attending Central Elementary School in Lake Charles, La., after her parents received a letter informing them of the transfer from her neighborhood school.

  • Evergreen Lake put another notch in its resume last week when the BBC program “Horizons”filmed figure skaters gliding in a planetary dance on the frozen waters.

    A BBC crew was at the lake Jan. 21 to shoot interviews and other footage for an episode tentatively called “Cosmic Pinball.”BBC researcher Jenna Lane said the “Horizons”episode will air on BBC Two in the United Kingdom later this year, then on the Science Channel in the U.S. on a future date.