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Features

  • The Hiwan Homestead Museum offered children a mixture of art, history, education and the great outdoors for a portion of the summer.

    In late July and early August, the museum has hosted its Hiwan Kids program, offering youngsters a chance to play outdoor pioneer games, make sand paintings and clay figures, and learn about local plants and wildlife on a nature tour, and experience Native American beadwork designs firsthand.

  • For Evergreen visitors, the lawn in front of the Lake House on the night of Aug. 10 was full of strangers. But for locals, it was a field of familiar faces — friends, neighbors, acquaintances from church and the gym, fellow PTA parents, clients and classmates.

    The Evergreen Park and Recreation District’s Summer Concert Series, as organizers and concert-goers agreed, allows the community to come together to enjoy a free, fun Wednesday night outside.

  • Shadow and Sundance are two Labradors, 8 and 9 years old, one black and one yellow: companions, best friends, figurative brothers. Before they were adopted a month ago, the pair spent several weeks at the Intermountain Humane Society waiting for someone with a big heart, unending patience and a predilection for the underdog — especially the underdog that comes as a pair.

  • The Mountain Area Pregnancy Center has a new name, a new look and new services for expectant mothers, couples and families.

    Life’s Options will continue to offer free pregnancy tests, counseling and parenting classes and is looking to add ultrasound services in the coming months.

    The nonprofit was previously located inside the Mother’s Closet at 27884 Meadow Drive, but now has moved into office space on the north side of the same complex at 27888 Meadow Drive. Mother’s Closet has been remodeled but remains in the same location.

  • At 9 p.m. Friday, the lights at the Evergreen High football field went dark. Dozens of people broke glow sticks and continued walking on the track.

    And everyone was quiet. Not a word or a whisper. Nothing but the soft footsteps, the glowing sticks, and the names that guided their walk: John. Susan. Tyler. Vic. Mom. Dad. Friend. Loved one.

  • To paraphrase a proverb: There’s a place for everyone, and everyone has a place.

    No truer words could describe Mountain Community Pathways, an Evergreen program for adults with disabilities. The program, in its third year, provides a place for those with special needs to learn, grow and make friends for six hours a day, five days a week.

    It also operates a home in Evergreen for three developmentally disabled clients and provides a home host provider network so developmentally disabled adults can live in homes other than with their families.

  • Four boys ducked into a niche with computers and other office equipment — an effective hiding spot. After a few minutes, they decided it was time to make a run for it. One of them pushed a chair in front of him as a shield. Another yelled, “For the rebellion!” A library staff member reminded them to keep their laser guns visible — otherwise they’d be cheating.

  • If there can be Christmas in July, why not New Year’s in August?

    With all the ceremony of the giant ball in Times Square, a net full of nearly 4,500 yellow ducks dropped in Evergreen on Saturday to the cheers of spectators, kicking off the seventh annual Dam Ducky Derby.

  • As the Fat Babies closed down the Elks Lodge ballroom on Saturday night, most of the band took a break while a trio of piano, drums and clarinet serenaded the dozen or so couples who remained on the dance floor. And, for a moment, the ballroom felt alive with the presence of past generations of jazz fans and musicians. The band seemed fuller than its three pieces.

    For newcomers and those unfamiliar with the genre, the 2016 Evergreen Jazz Festival was a new experience. But for many of the festival attendees, jazz music and dancing are not only a hobby but a tradition.

  • For Evergreen High School graduates who attend the old-timers reunion each year, it’s about homecoming.

    The grads catch up at a potluck lunch at Evergreen Lutheran Church. Saturday’s gathering, the 31st for the old-timers, was no exception.

    “It’s about history and connections and seeing former classmates,” said Donna Long Beck, class of 1967, who attended with her mom, Betty Fields Long, class of 1942.

  • The Great Plains in general, and Kansas in particular, might seem like a barren landscape compared to the breathtaking beauty of the Colorado Rockies. Frontier explorer Zebulon Pike certainly thought so, supposedly calling the region the “Great American Desert.”

    But photographer Jim Griggs of McPherson, Kan., says that, if photographing the Great Plains has taught him anything, it’s that “if you can take good photos there, you can take them anywhere.”

  • As her father walked her down the aisle, Jacqueline Davis saw her groom, Sean Toomey, and 30 family members and friends surrounded by the beautiful artwork of St. Peter’s Basilica.

    Rather than a local ceremony or a tropical destination wedding, Catholic couple Sean and Jacqueline Toomey were married at the Vatican on June 6. The honor is a rare one, as only four couples from the United States wed at the Vatican each year.

  • If you can’t see the forest for the trees, maybe that’s because you’re in a treehouse.

    The Evergreen area has a wide variety of treehouses that make their owners proud — from a Hobbit-like playhouse to one with a zip-line attached to a playhouse/treehouse with a suspension bridge. Don’t forget the “Geometree,” an octagonal treehouse.

  • Barking bundles of wet fur lined the Evergreen National Bank drive-thru in downtown Evergreen on Sunday as volunteers ran a dog-wash assembly line — all to benefit the Evergreen Animal Protective League.

    Dogs ranging from Bernese mountain dogs to shih tzus stood in several kiddie pools to be washed and rinsed, and finally dried. Once a dog shook off water and moved to the drying station, another was walked in for its turn to get a bath.

    Owners, holding glasses of wine, took charge of their now clean canines that sported green bandanas around their necks.

  • Toad. Scorpion. Snake. Owl.

    This lineup of nocturnal stars won over the 30 library visitors who came to see them July 11.

    The Evergreen Library hosted a “Creatures of the Night” presentation by the Sedalia-based Nature’s Educators, as part of its children’s program. The educators presented the animals, and informed younger and older audience members how each had adapted to live and hunt during the nighttime.

  • Increased foot traffic at area monuments, statues, sculptures, schools, churches, trailheads and other landmarks partly is thanks to Pokémon GO.

    The smart-phone game application, which launched two weeks ago and is now the biggest mobile game in U.S. history, encourages players to find virtual creatures called Pokémon. The game uses the phones’ GPS to track the players’ movements and locations, and rewards them for visiting local landmarks.

  • Yoga at the recreation center is customary, and yoga outside with a scenic view is ideal. But yoga on a paddleboard on a pond with mountain views is a bit unusual.

    On July 13, six students prepared for bent-knee, or sridaiva, yoga — also known as bowspring — on paddleboards in Buchanan Ponds.

  • Acrylics and dyes. Metal and wood. Glass and clay. Gold, silver and bronze. Dazzling neons and muted tones. The gentle tones of wind chimes. The soft texture of cloth. Bright and dazzling photographs of nature.

    The Center for the Art’s 37th annual Summerfest once again turned Buchanan Park into an eclectic display of artistry, from clothing and jewelry to paintings and woodcarvings. Plus, with food, drinks, music and other entertainment, the entire field was alive with an assortment of activities for visitors to enjoy.

  • Former Conifer resident Jana Elliott, who was killed in a highway crash July 10 after stopping to assist other motorists in Lakewood, is remembered as a person who always wanted to help others.

    Elliott was a passenger in a vehicle traveling east on West Sixth Avenue near Indiana Street when she and the driver, Sharon Young, saw a bicycle fall off a car in front of them.

  • Editor’s note: This story is part of a continuing series on the growing number of elderly in the mountain area.

    With the nation’s senior population expected to double within the next 15 years, the pinch to keep pace will be felt nowhere more keenly than at the Seniors’ Resource Center.