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Features

  • Artists loved to be challenged. As a visual artist, every day, you are searching for something new that will inspire. Meryl Sabeff, owner of the Evergreen Gallery, challenged her artists to put their own spin on the idea of “home” in the gallery’s latest show, “Beyond These Walls.” The results were whimsical, welcoming and wonderful.

  • These days, plenty of theater productions make you think. StageDoor Theatre’s latest production of Neil Simon’s hit show “Rumors” is theater that makes you laugh ee and laugh and laugh and laugh.

    “We picked this show because it would be fun,” says Fran Arniotes, one of 10 cast members. “There’s a lot of stuff that’s challenging for today’s audiences, and we thought that with the economy and the way the world is today, people just want to escape and laugh.”

  • Like many artists, Kathy Dawson loves to travel. As a young woman, Dawson lived and danced professionally in Germany. Over the years, Dawson continued to travel and has visited far-flung places throughout the world. Dawson drew inspiration for her watercolors from the villages and castles of Italy and France. Then, several years ago, she took it a step further. Dawson began incorporating actual souvenirs from her travels into her art — and stumbled upon a combination for which she has earned acclaim throughout Denver.

  • Once more it is time for the September Song. Where has the summer gone? For me, it has flown, wasted by being sick, doctoring, etc. My favorite time of the year and, now that I seem to be somewhat better, where have all the flowers gone?

    With any kind of luck, we may still have a month or two of lovely fall weather. September brings the turning of the aspen leaves from green to gold. By the end of the month Golden, Colo., is at its best.

  • There are countless plays, musicals and movies about Noah. And each one ends the same — with a monumental flood and a rainbow. But how many of us really know about Noah, the man responsible for repopulating the Earth as we know it? Have you ever thought about Noah’s life before he was thrust into the spotlight?

    The premiere of the musical “Noah: Come Hell or High Water” will take place Sept. 3. Everything you thought you knew about Noah and the Ark will be turned upside down.

  • Mitch Andasola’s last name means “one who walks alone” in the Navajo language. In many regards, the name is fitting for this artist, who works as a therapist at the Wheat Ridge Regional Center.

  • A few weeks ago a lady named Elizabeth phoned to tell me she had seen a lizard in her yard on Old Squaw Pass Road. She was delighted to have this new resident sharing her garden but wondered what kind it was and why she had never seen one before.

    The answer to what kind of lizard it is: It probably is an eastern fence lizard, since they are the only species likely to be seen here.

  • August is upon us with its hot, muggy weather. Totally unlike most Colorado weather, it is my least favorite month of the year. Monsoon winds coming up out of the gulf or from Southern California are moist enough to bring humid air but unfortunately are all too often not moist enough to bring rain. It has already been a hot, dry summer, so we really need some rain.

  • Editor’s note: Sylvia Brockner was under the weather last week, so we’re reprinting a column that ran on Aug. 3, 1988.

    July has flown by with the speed of a hummingbird. August will, I fear, probably pass as swiftly. Would that there was some way to catch summer and hold it a little longer.

  • A friend volunteering at the Evergreen Nature Center last week asked me about an odd water mammal called a nutria. It seems that a volunteer on the boardwalk has pointed out a muskrat to a group of visitors, and this person came into the center and informed the volunteer on duty that “those animals out there are not muskrats; I grew up in Louisiana, and they are nutria. I have seen enough nutria that I know what they look like.”

  • How did it become the 4th of July already? Half the year is gone. Spring and the magical month of May are long gone, but just today I received a copy of the birds recorded at Evergreen Lake during May. It was compiled by Warren Roske from the list displayed on the lake bulletin board by Warren and several other regular visitors, especially Loie Evans, who rarely misses a morning bird walk around the lake.

  • It is sad to report that the song sparrow nest met with ill fate.

  • Robert Frost wrote, “Good fences make good neighbors.” In the case of artists Kevin Scofield and Christian Dore, good aspens make good neighbors. Or, inversely, good neighbors are brought together by good aspens. Most importantly, great art made by good neighbors looks even greater hanging on good aspens.

    Let’s start at the beginning. In 2001, photographer Kevin Scofield and his wife, Pam, relocated to Morrison. By day, Scofield is the news operations manager at Fox 31 Denver.

  • On a recent Sunday morning, Linda Zakes of Sundance Gardens phoned me to ask about a bird. I was flabbergasted when she told me it had built a nest in a pot of penstemon on one of the display tables in her nursery. I finished up the work I was doing and was on my way to Sundance Gardens filled with curiosity about which bird had built its nest in such an unusual place.

  • Summer weather is finally here, with all its outdoor activities. Hiking, birding, botanizing, camping, boating, swimming, climbing and exploring the backcountry are all part of summer’s pleasures. However, there are hazards in the outdoors that everyone should be aware of.

  • All during the long, cold spring, Community Weed Day is the day I have longed for.

    This is a “what is so rare as a day in June.” Sun, an intensely blue sky, white puffy clouds and a crisp gentle breeze have combined to make this a “perfect” day. A few widely scattered showers cooled off the afternoon, but now the sun is out, and everything is “bright and beautiful” again.

  • Editor’s note: Sylvia Brockner was a little under the weather last week, so we’re reprinting a column from June 1987. Sylvia reports that she’s feeling much better and that her column will return next week.

    My husband, Bill, and I have spent considerable time in our breeding bird atlas territory this past week.

    I fully expected to enjoy the time spent birding, but there is an additional dividend that I had not foreseen.

  • On Thursday morning, May 15, the birds at Evergreen Lake were awakened by the robust, rollicking song, “bob-o-link, bob-o-link, spink, spank, spink.” Words cannot do justice to the jubilant, bubbling sound of the bobolink. It is a loud explosion of exuberant joy, sung during migration and heard even more once they are on their breeding grounds. They sing on the wing, flying horizontally above the grasses in the fields where they nest.

  • One of the fondest memories of my childhood is that of the chipping sparrows that nested every year among the orange rose-like flowers of the vine that grew on a trellis between the window and the door to the cow barn. This location was subject to considerable traffic, as both people and farm equipment passed within a few feet of it frequently. The nest was about 5 feet up in the vine, just high enough that my mother had to lift me up to see the greenish-blue eggs with their purple-black markings.

  • I have received many inquiries lately about the Rocky Mountain pine beetle and whether or not I thought we were going to lose all our ponderosa pines, whether we should spray and with what, and, the real panic question, will we lose all our forests?